Naidoc Week – 8th of July Songlines

Newsletters, SmartLessons

I’d like to begin by acknowledging the Boonwurrung People the Traditional Owners of the land on which this article was written today. I would also like to pay my respects to Elders past and present.

Why are song and dance an important part of the Australian Culture?

Being able to pass on information to the next generation is what a culture is made of. With the oldest continious culture of the world found right here in Australia, there is a lot of history. Whilst some was lost during colonisation there is still a rich and vibrant history kept alive and passed on through song and dance, the arts and the dreaming.

Today we will watch some songlines from a few of the over 500 nations that make up Australia.

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The Marella (Emu Man) Songline is from the Djugan Country, which starts at Gantheaume Point in Broome, and travels through the Dampier Peninsular, crosses the sea to Kulumburru and on to Uluru.

Songlines – Footprints

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The Lurujarri Songline starts north of One Arm Point and travels 450 kilometers to the south of Bidyadanga, the exit place.

Songlines – Naji

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This Manikay is sung traditionally by Djambarrpunu Clan. Milkarri is a sorrow Manikay (songline), is sung by women from this clan to cry about a longing for Ngurruyurrtjurr (homeland/clan).

Songlines – Bulunu Milkarri

 

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The women travel from Roebourne in the Pilbara and move, in some cases underground, all the way through to Kiwikurra in the Great Sandy Desert far to the south of Balgo, where they split up, some heading east and some north.

The women are searching for men to take as husbands.

Songlines – Tjawa Tjawa

Musicians, those who compose your emotions

SmartLessons

Are you a horror movie fan?

I remember being at home alone once after my parents had told me I could not watch the movie poltergeist. But in my young mind I thought, i’m tough. It won’t scare me!

It came to 9pm and it started.

The name flashed up on the screen

papa poltergeist GIF

and there was a power cut in my house!

Yes! Home alone.

After watching the opening credits of a movie my parents told me not to and now the house is dark and even scarier.

terrified GIF

I am 29 now and still haven’t watched the movie. I don’t think I ever will.

What makes movies so scary? The imagery is part of it. But there is something that gets under our skin. Raises our heartbeat. Makes our hair stand on end.

Dark Running GIF

But how does the background music change how we feel about a scene?

Score is a Documentary about the composers behind some of the most memorable moments in TV and Movie history.

Here are a few scenes with and without music.

Seems almost silly right?

SCORE: A Film Music Documentary

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A look at the cinematic art of the film musical score, and the artists who create them.

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Dunkirk – Life or Death on the beaches

SmartLessons, Video Highlights

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DUNKIRK HD (2017)

The Battle of Dunkirk was a military operation that took place in Dunkirk (Dunkerque), France, during the Second World War. The battle was fought between the Allies and Nazi Germany. As part of the Battle of France on the Western Front, the Battle of Dunkirk was the defense and evacuation to Britain of British and other Allied forces in Europe from 26 May to 4 June 1940.

What was it like on the beach?

The German Dive-Bombers had sirens on them to spread terror.

They dropped leaflets letting the soldiers know that they were surrounded.

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The beach was too shallow for their troop transport ships to land so hundreds of small boats had to pick them up.

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We learn more about this battle which could have ended the war for the allies.

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Dunkirk The New Evidence

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The Dunkirk Story

 

 

Metropolis (1927)

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

timothy-eberly-382663-unsplashFritz Lang’s 1927 film Metropolis was ground breaking in many ways. At the time, it was the most expensive German film ever made, costing over 5 million reichsmarks and taking 17 months to film, nearly financially capsizing the production studio, UFA. As one of the first feature length science fiction films ever made, Metropolis is an expansive story that is renowned even today for its extravagant scenery, art direction, cinematography and utilisation of German expressionist techniques. At its original run time of 153 minutes, it was one of the longest films made, contributing to its initial financial failure, as it required over four kilometres of film to run it, a weighty investment for any theatre. With the science fiction genre as we know it today still largely being defined in this era (Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, often considered the first work of science fiction, was published in 1818), it was a difficult film to categorise and advertise. Indeed, an advertisement from New Zealand reads ‘See it! Try to describe it!’ Nonetheless, it has since become recognised as a highly influential film, becoming the first film to be inscribed on UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register in 2001, and is widely studied in schools today for both its historical context as part of the Weimar Republic, an example of early science fiction, German Expressionism and the utilisation of the silent film genre.

The film was accompanied by a novelisation, published in 1925 by director Fritz Lang’s then-wife and credited screenwriter, Thea von Harbou. However, it was the film that really made an impact, with many praising its technical prowess whilst simultaneously lambasting it as being overlong and overwrought. Mordaunt Hall of the New York Times called it “a technical marvel with feet of clay”, whilst renowned sci-fi author H.G Wells criticised the film as being rampant with “foolishness, cliché, platitude and muddlement about mechanical progress and progress in general.” Regardless of these criticisms, Metropolis has undoubtedly had an impact upon contemporary science fiction, with as film critic Roger Ebert stated “from this film in various ways, descended not only ‘Dark City’, but ‘Blade Runner’, ‘The Fifth Element’, ‘Alphaville’, Escape From L.A’, ‘Gattaca’ and Batman’s Gotham City… Rotwang created the visual look of mad scientists for decades to come, especially after it was mirrored in ‘The Bride of Frankenstein’… the device of the ‘false Maria’… inspired the ‘Replicants’ of ‘Blade Runner.’” It was one of the first examples of the dystopia / utopia theme in science fiction, something that has continued to be explored (e.g.: 1984, Brave New World, Never Let Me Go, The Matrix, etc.) and has seen a resurgence in recent years.

The film’s most famous quote, “the mediator between head and hands must be the heart” reverberates throughout the entire film, with Metropolis demonstrating a schism between the upper and lower classes. In this case it is literal, with the lower classes living underground and the upper classes living amongst the sprawling excess of the city, overshadowed by their monolithic buildings, which are a combination of the grandeur of Greco-Roman architecture and luxe, geometric (harking back to the streamlined appearance of machines) Art Deco. Indeed, the sets appear to dwarf the actors, with the machines and the structures taking visual precedence. This is exemplified when Freder imagines one of the machines as Moloch, a Canaanite god / idol that required child sacrifice that is referenced in Leviticus. This precedence of machines is rectified by the end of the film, but this also highlights Lang’s propensity for biblical allusions throughout the film- the tower of Babel, the idolatress of Babylon and the beast with seven heads, Maria as a virtuous Mary figure preaching to the workers, Freder as a Christlike mediator between above and below, the gardens as a reference to Eden, etc. This lends the story gravity and also helped in creating a grounding point for the audience, references that they were familiar with amongst the fantastical landscape Lang presented.

Metropolis was released during the ‘golden era’ of the Weimar Republic, a brief period of stability and prosperity in Germany, prior to World War II. With a permanent currency implemented in 1923 and the Dawes Plan in 1924, it sparked a cultural renaissance, born in the wake of World War I, the immense hyperinflation and the influence of the cultural development in the Soviet Union. Innovations in German cinema, literature, architecture (particularly Bauhaus), film, art and theatre came to the forefront, with a fascination with the ‘ultramodern’ in addition to the mediums of cabaret and jazz and an overall differentiation from more traditional German values- an influence that is certainly explored in Metropolis. There was a certain contention between the pull of traditional values versus the influence of globalisation and the influx of other cultures, particularly America (via American films and fashion), with Americanisation progressing largely due to the Dawes Plan.

German Expressionism was at its peak during this time, with Metropolis being a prime example. It was more concerned with the evocation of a particular mood and aimed to show a highly subjective view of the world, as compared to the strict realism and somewhat detached perspective of art and film previously. This internal perspective was highly effective and necessary in silent film, given the absence of audible dialogue. This was characterised by evocative lighting (particularly via chiaroscuro, obviously highlighting certain objects / characters and casting others in shadow) and utilising different camera angles and perspectives. In the post World War I environment, there was an increased fascination with the human psyche, madness and the question of identity, as life as most people knew it had been irrevocably shifted.

Metropolis is a highly influential film that is broadly studied today. Whether you are exclusively studying the film or the Weimar Republic, 20th century Germany, the development of silent film or the consolidation of the science fiction genre, it is an important piece of culture that is still highly relevant.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources in relation to this subject. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education, just search for the titles below on your site:

Metropolis (Movie 1927)

German Expressionism: Crash Course Film History #7

Fritz Lang Interviewed by William Friedkin (1974)

The Silent Era: Crash Course Film History #9

The History of Cinema- Silent Era

BBC Paul Mertons Weird and Wonderful World of Early Cinema

Generation War (Part One)

Dawes Plan

Ten Minute History- The Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany (Short Documentary)

The Great Depression: Crash Course US History #33

 

 

Designing a productive garden (Science year 4 & 5)

SmartLessons, Video Highlights

Curriculum Code:

Living things, including plants and animals, depend on each other and the environment to survive (ACSSU073)

Scientific knowledge is used to inform personal and community decisions (ACSHE217)

Aim:

Increase students design and scientific skills as they design a school yard productive garden.

Preparing:

– Discuss the students understanding of a ‘productive garden’. What is a productive garden? How can we create one? When thinking about a garden and its crops what do we need to consider.
– Use the IWB link to help make a list of these concerns.

Link: Growing A Productive Garden

Presenting:

Search TV4Education for “Gardening Australia ACSSU073” and watch clip from 13:54 till 19:05.

– Discuss the issues that were brought up about the need for a community garden.

Add them to the list created above in ‘Growing a productive garden’.

Applying:

– Help place students into pairs and set them the task of designing their own productive garden. Students will need to show its size and the different types of plants and animals they will include.

– Draw the garden and surrounding buildings, walkways and water in order to show it’s area in the school.

– They will also need to be able to instruct others how their garden is productive.

This lesson could be a great lead up to a science project, using research tools students would be able to design and justify the reasons for their garden design and choice of animals and plants.

*Links:

Growing a Productive garden doc.

TV4Education Video Learning Lessons

Saving Energy (Science Year 1,2 & 3)

SmartLessons, Video Highlights

Curriculum Code:

Light and sound are produced by a range of sources and can be sensed (ACSSU020) People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for their environment and living things (ACSHE022) People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for their environment and living things (ACSHE035)
Science knowledge helps people to understand the effect of their actions (ACSHE051)

Aim:

Students develop understanding of energy and how to save energy.

Preparing:

– Ask students about energy, what gives us energy?
– Sing a song or dance of high energy which will show good instructions on how to use up energy.
– Once complete ask students how they feel? Did you feel this way before we sung or danced?
– Explain energy, what uses it, how we use it? How we need to save it etc.
– Listen to the story ‘The Day Amy saved the World’ and then discuss what she did to save energy.

Presenting:

– Have students look at different energy uses around the home. Have students make a list of different items in the house that use energy. Open up the link below and look at the different items in Amy’s house that uses energy.
– Link: Amy’s Energy saving website. (Click on Amy’s House)
– Watch Eco Maths Clip – http://www.tv4education.com/SmartLibrary/SmartLibraryWeb/TitleView.html?BookID=151132.01

Applying:

– Have students use the link below to draw different items in their house that uses energy. Talk about ways we can reduce the energy used at home.
– Have students place this into their science books.
– Link: We can Save Energy

Links:

‘The Day Amy saved the World’
http://www.amysenergysave.com.au/storybook/index.html#/the-day- amy-helped- save-the- world
Amy’s Energy saving website.
http://www.amysenergysave.com.au/index.html
We can Save Energy doc.

PROGRAMS FOR #WORLDENVIRONMENTDAY

Atom Studyguides, SmartLessons

World Environment Day occurs on the 5th of June every year, and is the United Nation’s principal vehicle for encouraging awareness and action for the protection of our environment.

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Do you wonder if you’re making a difference? Do you make sure you put your recyclables in the right place? Do you cycle to work? Or drive a hybrid?

I wonder if my choices make a difference, I recycle what I can, try to buy foods with less packaging and clothes that are made from the greenest fibers.

But can I just 1 in 7 billion make a difference?

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With veganism on the rise, ethical businesses booming and the shift to renewables is really changing the world. Will they be enough?

Here are a few programs that have been requested by Australian teachers for their content to start a conversation about the environment and how we can individually and collectively make a difference.

Sonic Sea

Oceans are a sonic symphony. Sound is essential to the survival and prosperity of marine life. But man-made ocean noise is threatening this fragile world.

Sonic Sea is about protecting life in our waters from the destructive effects of oceanic noise pollution.

Watch the full documentary here

Parched

Water is so essential to life that we cannot survive without it for more than three days. But its limited. On Earth, only 3% of our water is fresh, with less than 1% available for human use. The other 2% is locked inside the Poles. Today, with over a billion people lacking access to clean drinking water, we are finally being forced to confront a stark reality: a future where, in many parts of the world, fresh water is scarce, expensive, and out of our hands. PARCHED is a feature documentary and four episodes that takes a character-driven and investigative approach to find out who really controls water in this country — and in the world.

Watch all 4 Episodes here

Years of Living Dangerously

This Emmy-winning series follows celebrity correspondents around the world, to witness first-hand the effects of climate change on our planet and to learn how we can save it for future generations.

2 seasons available on TV4Education here

Before the Flood (2016)

A look at how climate change affects our environment and what society can do to prevent the demise of endangered species, ecosystems and native communities across the planet.

Watch it now on TV4Education

Food Inc (2009)

An unflattering look inside America’s corporate controlled food industry.

Watch it now on TV4Education

Waste Land (2010)

Waste Land” is an award winning documentary by director Lucy Walker – An uplifting feature documentary highlighting the transformative power of art and the beauty of the human spirit. Top-selling contemporary artist Vik Muniz takes us on an emotional journey from Jardim Gramacho, the world’s largest landfill on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro, to the heights of international art stardom. Vik collaborates with the brilliant catadores, pickers of recyclable materials, true Shakespearean characters who live and work in the garbage quoting Machiavelli and showing us how to recycle ourselves.

Watch it now on TV4Education

The Age of Consequences

‘The Hurt Locker’ meets ‘An Inconvenient Truth’, THE AGE OF CONSEQUENCES investigates the impacts of climate change on increased resource scarcity, migration, and conflict through the lens of US national security and global stability.

Watch it now on TV4Education

Follow the shocking, yet humorous, journey of an aspiring environmentalist, as he daringly seeks to find the real solution to the most pressing environmental issues and true path to sustainability.

Happy Horticulturalists – School Garden 101

SmartLessons

Does your school have its own vege garden?

Here are a few ideas on how to build one or how to add to your current garden.

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Design

Indoor:

Plants you can grow in your classroom

Years 1 – 3

Cress Head

Related image

Spring Onions

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Simply cut the spring onions a few cms from the end and put them into either water or soil. This example used old toilet rolls.

Outdoor:

Recyclable materials

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Ecomaths – Recycling Start clip at 6:20

In this episode, Stefan visits a vast recycling plant to explore how 2-D and 3-D shapes are used to sort and reuse rubbish, and visits a school that uses recycled objects in many different ways.

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Ecomaths – Snail VS Lamb

Will Snails be coming to a dinner plate near you in the future?

What is the future of agriculture?

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Food Unwrapped Specials – Meat

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Horizon – Hungry Challenge

How do you fight hunger in the 21st Century? Horizons looks at the importance of drought-tolerant crops and the need to combat food insecurity in the developing and developed world. It also examines the need to clean up our oceans and manage our agriculture in a smarter way.

Can we look to the past to learn about sustainability in the future?

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First Footprints

9,000 years ago people in Australia were learning to manipulate available plants and animals to increase food resources. They transformed an entire continent into a fully sustainable estate, until outsiders arrived

Do you enjoy our blog posts? Leave a comment below with a topic you would like to have made into a lesson and we will make it for you.

 

The Renaissance

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

eric-terrade-8615-unsplashThe Renaissance is one of the most fascinating and innovative periods in history, and also one of the most hotly debated. There is much contention as to whether or not it can really be considered, as the term Renaissance suggests, a ‘rebirth’ of society, following the Middle Ages, especially with its deep roots and harking back to Greco-Roman classicism, two empires that were recognised as having ‘fallen’ almost a thousand years previously. Additionally, there is also debate as to whether or not it was a series of independent discoveries and philosophies made over several centuries (the Renaissance is commonly agreed to have been between c. 14th-17th centuries A.D) as opposed to a centralised movement. Regardless of one’s position on the matter, the Renaissance gave birth to some of the most innovative works of art, literature, architecture, inventions and discoveries in science and medicine that the world has seen since.

Originating in Florence, Italy, the Renaissance spread over the majority of Europe in the following centuries. It was grounded in the philosophy of humanism, which largely sought to hark back to the values of classical Greece and Rome, aiming to create a people group that were educated and literate, capable of utilising the studies of the humanities (e.g. philosophy, history, poetry, rhetoric, etc.) for the betterment of their broader society, rather than it being an elusive mark of status. It was the idea of humanism that largely birthed the popular idea of the ‘Renaissance man’- one that was well versed in everything from literature to art, Greek and Roman myths, science, history, theology, engineering and even stonemasonry, as opposed to focusing all their attention upon their designated trade. This Renaissance ideal is epitomised in many of the icons of the era, à la Galileo, Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. Da Vinci, for example, whilst likely best known as a painter, also considered himself a philosopher, engineer, sculptor, engineer, architect and more, whilst Michelangelo was also an architect and poet in addition to being a renowned sculptor and painter, with a keen interest in anatomy. There was a central ideology of this ‘whole’ education informing every aspect of their lives and working practice as opposed to a more isolated focus.

The Renaissance period is perhaps most commonly renowned for its art, after all, it is responsible for masterpieces such as the ‘Mona Lisa’, Michelangelo’s ‘David’, ‘The Last Supper’, Botticelli’s ‘The Birth of Venus’ and many more. There was a huge elevation in the status of the artist during this period, largely due to patronage from wealthy clients such as the Medici and Borgia families. The influence of humanism is evident in much of the art, with artist’s knowledge of mathematics, anatomy, architecture, etc. vastly developing art in a way that had not  previously been widespread. Additionally, the ideals and newfound fascination with classicism’s interest in accurate anatomy and fascination with the physical form partnered with the religious influence and monetary support of the Church paved the way for many masterpieces on a scale never before seen in history, obvious in works such as Michelangelo’s ‘David’, ‘Pieta’ and Sistine Chapel Ceiling. The grandeur of religion was fully fledged and the asceticism previously demonstrated in Christianity largely fell from favour, at least in regards to art and architecture.

Whilst the period may be most commonly renowned for its contributions to art and architecture, it also gave birth to some incredibly revolutionary inventions: the printing press, the mechanical clock, the telescope, the microscope, eyeglasses, the barometer, italics, the violin, the anemometer, the list goes on. In short, the Renaissance undoubtedly shaped our cultural view of the modern world as we know it, be it Galileo’s radical advances in astronomy or Gutenberg’s printing press.

The Renaissance period is one of the most influential times in history, arguably being a catalyst for the world as we know it today. Its effect is visible in almost every field and subject, with the explorations of art, science, literature and more largely forming the foundation for contemporary culture in the West. Whilst it may be more explicitly studied in art or history, knowledge of the Renaissance period will undoubtedly benefit any students understanding of their subject.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources in relation to this subject. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education, just search for the titles below on your site:

The Renaissance Unchained- God, Myths and Oil Paints (S01E01)

Italy Unpacked

Self Portraits of the Me Generation- Togetherness (S01E01)

Great Scientists- Galileo

Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man of Math

Inside the Mind of Leonardo

The Caravaggio Affair

The Nude in Art with Tim Marlow, The Renaissance, EP2

Bronzino Restoring Genius

Masterpieces of the Hermitage Raphael, Da Vinci & The High Italian Renaissance S01 E11

Masterpieces of the Hermitage Art of the Early Italian Renaissance S1 E10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Steinbeck

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

debby-hudson-571368-unsplashJohn Steinbeck (1902-1968) was one of the most influential American writers of the 20th century, dubbed ‘a giant of American letters’ and shaping the face of modern literature along with other giants of the craft such as Hemingway, Faulkner and Fitzgerald. Having won both the Pulitzer and Nobel Prize in his lifetime, it is undeniable that his work resonated deeply with his readers, renowned for his syncretism of realism and imagination, and perhaps most profoundly, his social commentary. This is perhaps most famously displayed in his magnum opus, the 1939 tome The Grapes of Wrath, detailing the influence of the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression on American families. It is this acute depiction of wider historical and social issues that were sweeping America that has, in part, made his body of work so enduring and widely studied to this day.

Growing up in California, Steinbeck utilised this ground as the basis for much of his work- East of Eden, Cannery Row, Tortilla Flat, The Grapes of Wrath, The Red Pony and many more were centred around this locale, capturing in part the nostalgia and mythicism of childhood and the fables he grew up, largely influenced by the nobility of the stories of King Arthur and tempered with the realism of the people he grew up with: the ‘paisanos’ and ranch hands and ordinary working class of America. This fascination with lore and legend is apparent throughout much of his work, influencing his voice in stories such as Tortilla Flat, where he explicitly poses Danny and his ramshackle friends as knights of the Round Table.

With Steinbeck’s body of work amounting to 27 books throughout his lifetime, Steinbeck was renowned for his social perception and adhered largely to the old adage of ‘write what you know’- mirrored through his portrayals of central California and the people who lived there, in addition to the plights and influence of the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression. It is this correlation between his life and what Steinbeck wrote that ensures that an understanding of his life is crucial to the study of his work. Despite his statement that ‘writers are a little below clowns and a little above trained seals’, his work has had an enduring influence beyond the factor of entertainment, and he is touted today as having produced some of the seminal great American novels of the 20th century.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources in relation to this subject. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education, just search for the titles below on your site:

Great Writers- John Steinbeck

A Letter to Elia

The Grapes of Wrath (movie 1940)

Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck audiobook part 1

Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck audiobook part 2

John Steinbeck: An American Writer

John Steinbeck gives Nobel Prize Speech

Of Mice and Men (1992)

 

 

 

 

#PlanetorPlastic

SmartLessons

Look down at your right or your left hand and there is a 99% chance you are touching plastic right now.

Now look around the room you are sitting in and try and count how many pieces you can see.

My mouse, my keyboard, the phone on my desk, the screen I am using to write this on, the components of my computer, The cables, the pens on my desk. The wheels on the office chair I’m sitting on. within 1 meter I have found 10 things either made of our using plastic components.

Plastic breaks down, very slowly.

animation film GIF by Disney Pixar

We don’t actually know how long it takes, because none of the plastic we have made has ever broken down. Well it does get smaller and end up in the food chain, but that’s a different topic

Most plastic ends up here:

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War On WasteWar On Waste (s01e02)

Or here:

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Four Corners – Oceans of Plastic

and about 9% gets here:

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What can we do?

What really happens to the plastic you throw away – Emma Bryce

Ecomaths – Recycling (s01e02)

Rising Recycling