I Was There- The Great War Interviews

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

stijn-swinnen-259744-unsplashI Was There- The Great War Interviews is a fantastic resource for students studying World War I. Extrapolating upon the original 1964 documentary series The Great War, this documentary provides a deeper look at the original collation of 280 eyewitness interviews, with never-before-seen footage of both soldiers and civilians. Thus, it provides invaluable insight into the behemoth that is WWI.

It is often easy to become overwhelmed by the sheer scale of an event like WWI, whereas I Was There- The Great War Interviews offers a deeply personal perspective, with interviews from a broad range of primary sources, from celebrated author Mabel Lethbridge O.B.E, soldiers Sebastian C. Lang, Charles Carrington, Wilhelm Eisenthal, factory worker Katie Morter, and many more.  In addition to this, both the Allied and Central sides are represented, thus significantly minimising any inherent bias.

Whilst the overall strategic and historical outlines are not discussed in great detail, the documentary explores the human relations of the war, such as the methods of recruitment, be it women using white feathers to represent cowardice, propaganda posters, the utilisation of music hall stars like Vesta Tilley, pro-war effort music and film, etc., all designed to solicit enlistment. It also showcases the changing attitudes of towards the war, from the initial excitement and euphoria to the grim realisation of the horrors of the battlefield, with soldier Frank Brent stating that ‘…it (the war) required that we should live in animal conditions… inevitable that we would develop the animal characteristic of killing.’

Furthermore, the documentary successfully displays the disparity between soldiers and civilians, with former soldier Charles Carrington stating ‘one was seemingly annoyed by their (civilians) attempts to sympathise… which only really reflects that they didn’t understand at all’, whilst Mabel Lethbridge noted a ‘…a strange lack of ability to communicate… to tell us (civilians) what it was really like… They were restless at home… They didn’t want to stay home. They wanted to get back.’

The battlefield is displayed as a kind of microcosm, running from being ‘an inferno’, with the apparent need to ‘exact retribution’ from the enemy, to the Easter and Christmas armistices and the ‘deceptive peace’ that fraternisation with the enemy brought, with men singing together in the trenches, exchanging gifts and addresses for after the war.  The documentary aims to explore multiple facets of the human experience of the Great War, recognising that to focus on only one would be to vastly limit its representation of this vast moment in history.

I Was There- The Great War Interviews proves to be a deeply personal look at a time in history that has deeply rooted itself in our collective psyche. The utilisation of such a wide range of primary sources will certainly be of interest to students and assist in broadening their understanding of WWI.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources that can be used in relation to the topics covered in this post. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education just search for the titles below on your site.

I Was There- The Great War Interviews

Lest We Forget What- The Commemoration of WW1 and the ANZAC Legend

100 Years of ANZAC: The Spirit Lives 2014-2018, World War 1, Conscription (S01E21)

The Panzer

World War I’s Tunnels of Death- The Killing Fields (S01E01)

14 Diaries of the Great War- Into the Abyss (S01E01)

The War that Changed Us- Answering the Call (S01E01)

 

Fry’s Planet Word: Babel

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

patrick-tomasso-71909-unsplashWhat is the value of language? Indeed, why is it something that we study, or devote the slightest iota of attention to? ‘Babel’, the first episode of Fry’s Planet Word, presented by Stephen Fry, explores this very notion, focussing upon the origins of language as a uniquely human concept, helping both teachers and students to gain a greater understanding of this foundational method of communication and thus obtain a greater appreciation, both of its importance and how it continues to shift and develop over time.

At its root, language is the grounding method of communication, but it does far more than that, with the acquisition and development of our utilisation of language being, according to Fry, ‘the most complex bit of brain processing that we know of.’ It goes beyond an animalistic need to communicate fear, hunger, danger, etc., becoming a nuanced social medium that differentiates vastly from person to person based upon a multitude of factors: the particular language you speak, the breadth of your personal vocabulary and manner in which you use it, the register that you use, whether or not in is appropriate to use idioms and colloquialisms regarding the situation, the list goes on and on. In short, language is something that uniquely identifies us, but also allows us to find commonality and communicate with those around us.

At present, there are approximately 7,000 languages in use today, varying from a handful of users, to over a billion. Whilst many of these languages differentiate in their conception of sentence structure, complexity, breadth of vocabulary, whether or not they are vocalised (in the case of sign language), the vast majority are made up of the same basic components: nouns, to identify things; adjectives, to describe them; verbs, to tell you what they do. It is from the use of these building blocks that much of what we identify as being a uniquely human quality springs from, a sinuous and consistently changing lens through which our worldview is shaped, in addition to allowing other people to share in our perspective.

Fry demonstrates the pervasive and fundamental nature of language in ‘Babel’ through a myriad of ways: the initial acquisition of language as the documentary tracks 15 month old Ruby over a one year period, philology, the comparisons between the Turkana language and English, how communication methods between animals are vastly different than those explored in humans, the determining factors on if a language flourishes or dies out, how our brains are affected by language use, and many other topics.

‘Babel’ proves to be an informative and uniquely insightful glance into the value of language and how it underpins so much of our daily lives, and will prove to be of particular interest to English and Language students as a supplement to their primary studies.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources that can be used in relation to the topics covered in this post. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education just search for the titles below on your site.

Fry’s Planet Word- Babel (S01E01)

The Sound of Aus (2007) 

TED-ED Lessons Worth Sharing- The Controversial Origins of the Encyclopedia

How I’m Discovering the Secrets of Ancient Texts

 

Introduction to Romeo and Juliet – Year 10 English

SmartLessons

Year 10 English

Aim: Introducing ideas, language and themes of Romeo and Juliet.

Preparing:

Short animated clip of Romeo and Juliet

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SHAKESPEARE UNCOVERED – JOSEPH FIENNES – ROMEO AND JULIET

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Shakespeare’s Globe – ROMEO AND JULIET (2010)

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When Romeo Met Juliet S1 E1

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When Romeo Met Juliet S1 E2

When Romeo Met Juliet EP3

AUSTRALIAN BALLET – ROMEO AND JULIET

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Rwanda & Juliet

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Romeo and Juliet Movies:

Romeo And Juliet (1968)

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Romeo And Juliet (1996)

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ROMEO AND JULIET 2013

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West Side Story (1961)

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©Copyright Functional Solutions 2017

Analyzing advertising, Blogging and Film.

SmartLessons

Aim: To teach students how to analyze advertising, blogs, and films. Giving them understanding into the different techniques and elements used to create each of the above disciplines.

Preparing: Pick a blog, series of adverts or a movie and have the students watch or read the content, noting down as much as possible about the language used, imagery, music, and elements.

For a Film: A quick search of TV4Education with the keyword being “Film (2014) will bring up all the movies that were made in that year. We do have a number of new releases also. Once you have found the movie, you can then do the analysis in the following format.

For advertising: Since TV4Education has all of its videos ad free the best way to find adverts on TV4Education is to look for shows who talk about them for example Gruen

You can also use Youtube to find great advertising videos.

 

You can also use Atom Lessons

ATOM_LOGO

Presenting: 

Film: Film theory

Matrix Education

Full Movie here: TV4Education Link

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Full Movie here: TV4Education Link

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Advertising:

Writing Commons

Understand Media

Applying: 

Film

Enter an Australian Film Competition

Advertising

Understand Media

©Copyright Functional Solutions 2017

English Second Language

SmartLessons

Aim: To teach students how to deal with a particular situation with proper English and syntax.

English

Preparing:

Get students to pick a situation in which they want to learn about from the following list: Living English

Are there some Kangaroos

roo

Come to Lunch

lunch

You were going too fast

fast

Presenting:

After watching the clip get students in pairs to role-play the situation and give feedback on how they did.

Applying: 

This lesson can be repeated until students are fluent with all of the different scenarios.

©Copyright Functional Solutions 2017

Naidoc Week

Newsletters, Video Highlights

NAIDOC celebrations are held around Australia each July to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The week is celebrated not just in the Indigenous communities but also in increasing numbers of government agencies, schools, local councils and workplaces.

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First Australians – They Have Come To Stay

This landmark series chronicles the birth of contemporary Australia as never told before, from the perspective of its first people. It explores what unfolds when the oldest living culture in the world is overrun by the world’s greatest empire, and depicts the true stories of individuals – both black and white. The story begins in 1788 in Sydney with the friendship between an Englishmen, Governor Phillip, and a warrior, Bennelong.

Part 1 of 7

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art + soul – Home and Away

Art + Soul explores the diversity of Indigenous culture through three themes – home and away, dreams and nightmares and bitter and sweet. Drawing on key works from the Gallery’s collection, it reveals the myriad of contemporary artistic expressions that evidence the enduring heritage of Indigenous Australia, in all its diversity and complexity.

Part 1 of 3

Animated traditional stories explained by the Elders including the Dolphin NSW and the Wanka Manapulpa Minyma, WA
Animated traditional stories explained by the Elders including the Dolphin NSW and the Wanka Manapulpa Minyma, WA

 

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Manganinnie

Through Lyrical images, Manganinnie journeys across mountains towards the coast with Joanna, a white girl, in search of Manganinnie’s vanished tribe. The poignancy of this film derives from the Aboriginal woman’s gradual realization that her people and the tribal way of life are forever gone. It is the story of the Black Drive of 1830, the attempted genocide of the Tasmanian Aborigines.

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Anzacs Remembering Our Heroes

Anzacs – Remembering our heroes is a series of 15 minute documentary specials, produced by NITV to pay tribute to the military efforts of Indigenous people.

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Colour Theory – Teho Ropeyarn

From the northernmost tip of far north Queensland, Teho Ropeyarn’s bold prints have traversed Australia, winning awards and representing the distinctive culture of the Torres Strait Islands.

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Lurujarri Dreaming

This beautifully crafted animated documentary retraces the Lurujarri Dreaming Trail from the Goolarabooloo community in the Western Kimberley region of Western Australia.

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Cleverman (s01e01)

A series of unexplained violent attacks in the city are blamed on the newly discovered ‘Hairypeople’, who have been living and passing among us, without our knowledge.

Part 1 of 6

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Songlines – Footprints

Footprints is a film of the story, dance and culture of the Djugun people that has been brought to life from the dirt after 50 years, handed back to the Djugun people from its caretaker Roy Wiggan

Part 1 of 12

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Jandamarra’s War

The story of an Australian Aboriginal man who should be as famous as Ned Kelly. In 1894, Jandamarra led a three year rebellion against invading pastoralists in defence of his people’s ancient land and culture.

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The Chant Of Jimmie Blacksmith (1978)

Jimmie Blacksmith (Tommy Lewis), a man of half-Aboriginal ancestry, is pushed to the breaking point by the racist oppression perpetrated by the British in their rule of Australia in 1900, and by his inability to acclimate to Western culture. Raised in a white Christian family but never recognized by white individuals as their equal, Blacksmith undergoes frequent humiliations that provoke a violent response when he brutally murders his employer’s family.

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Walkabout (1971)

Under the pretense of having a picnic, a geologist (John Meillon) takes his teenage daughter (Jenny Agutter) and 6-year-old son (Lucien John) into the Australian outback and attempts to shoot them. When he fails, he turns the gun on himself, and the two city-bred children must contend with harsh wilderness alone. They are saved by a chance encounter with an Aborigine boy (David Gulpilil) who shows them how to survive, and in the process underscores the disharmony between nature and modern life.

Why is politics important?

Newsletters, Video Highlights

Why is politics important?

This newsletter will tell us about the origins of politics, the various types of government that exists and how this will affect the current and future generations.

Dictatorship

A dictatorship is a government or a social situation where one person makes all the rules and decisions without input from anyone else. Watch a dictator in action.

Communism

At the opposite end of the spectrum from capitalism, communism is an economic theory favouring a classless society and the abolition of private property. Watch a communist in action here.

Aristocracy

A person who’s “born to rule” belongs to the ruling class, or aristocracy, and is “noble” just by being in the family line. Whether they have done anything noble or not. Watch an aristocrat in action here.

Stalinism

The method of rule, or policies, of Joseph Stalin, Soviet Communist Party and state leader from 1929 until his death in 1953. Stalinism is associated with a regime of terror and totalitarian rule. Watch him in action here.

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Capitalism

Capitalism is an economic system featuring the private ownership of business wealth and the free and unfettered operation of trade markets. Watch a video that will highlight how capitalism works.

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Democracy

With Democracy the people get to decide the laws and ethics of a country. This allowed rights disallowed by many to be changed. Civil rights has effected every level of our society changing the laws we once held in high regard to shape the more common way people live their lives in 2016.

Race, gender and sexuality becoming issues which divided many nations, but with democracy we were able to collectively decide if this is what we want as a society. Watch a video that will highlight how democracy works.

Civil Rights

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Vote Yes For Aborigines

The 1967 referendum on Aborigines first saw that, Aboriginal people were finally counted as people, before they came under the Flora and Fauna Act. This lead on to the right to vote and access to many other liberties others had access to for decades.

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How Women Won The Vote

In 1902 Women were finally allowed to vote. Only 150 Years ago women had no rights when it came to voting or owning land. This documentary shows the lengths that these Australian men and women went to, ensuring this change.

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SELMA

After the Abolition of slavery in America in 1865 a hundred years later free people of colour were still unable to vote, access the same places, use the same facilities and go to the same schools as other Americans. Selma is the story of a famous March and turning point in the civil rights movement of the 1960’s. The use of “Jim Crow” laws allowed for the continued mistreatment of fellow American citizens by those sworn to serve and protect them.

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SUFFRAGETTES FOREVER – WOMEN AND POWER PART 1 

In the early 19th Century only those who owned property were allowed to vote in parliamentary elections. This included women who were rate payers. Thanks to the sufferage movements of the early 20th century those who did not own property both men and women finally were allowed to vote, Part 1 of the series shows some of the tactics used to get the vote for all. This legacy lead to modern Democracy as we know it.

Revolutions

Revolutions are the end result when societies are unable to come together collectively to change the rules in which makes that society unfair to a majority of people.

Spartacus

Spartacus was a thracian gladiator who, along with other escaped slaves began the Third Servile War, a major slave uprising against the Roman Republic. The rebellion has proved inspiration for many who have faced similar circumstances.

1916 – The Irish Rebellion

The Easter Rising or Easter Rebellion was an armed insurrection in Ireland during Easter week April 1916. The rising was launched by Irish republicans who wanted to end British rule in Ireland and establish a independent Irish Republic. Part 1 of 3

Braveheart

Sir William Wallace was a Scottish knight who became one of the main leaders of the Wars of Scottish Independence. The Battle of Stirling Bridge where the English were defeated and caused William Wallace to be given the title Guardian of Scotland. The Battle of Falkirk saw the Scottish defeated and Sir William Wallace stood down from his title. He was captured in 1305 and Hung for High Treason.

Jandamarra’s War

Jandamarra lead a 3 year organised war against european colonists. He became a legend with his people the Bunuba Tribe, who believed he was immortal as he used hit and run tactics killing many police and settlers. He was finally killed by Micki, another Aboriginal tracker who was recruited by his children being held hostage by local police.

The Future

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 PEOPLE & POWER – WHATS HAPPENING TO AMERICAN DEMOCRACY PART 1

What’s happening to American democracy? With a populist billionaire demagogue winning support on the right, a self-declared socialist confounding US historical prejudices on the left and millions of disenchanted voters apparently determined to disregard the political establishment in Washington, the nomination race for this year’s presidential poll has become one of the most peculiar and polarised electoral contests in decades.

Donald Trump – The Apprentice President

Since announcing his candidacy, Donald Trump is everywhere. This billionaire candidate has become the champion of ordinary America, who travel for hundreds of miles to see him.

Generation X- The Politics of X

A look at how the political consciousness of Generation X evolved over several decades especially in terms of race and women’s rights.

The Budget

See how the government decides how taxes, spending and cuts are decided and how they affect us all. With 50% of tax breaks going to the top 10% of earners. Many see the budget as unfair whilst others see it as just a part of a capitalistic society.

Popular Videos – what are other schools watching?

Video Highlights

Ever wondered what programs other schools in Australia are watching? Take a look at Mays most downloaded programs across Australia by clicking on the image below.

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Ted-Ed Lessons a Ted Talks Initiative

Video Highlights

Did you know that you can find all your favourite Ted Talks in one place? TV4Education Plus now also off video lessons from the Ted-Ed Lesson range.

View them all HERE. Or take a look at a few of our favourites…

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Shakespearean dating tips by Anthony John Peters

Beyond giving the world dozens of English language masterpieces and inventing countless words (including the word countless), William Shakespeare, ever the overachieving bard, especially had a way with the romantic turn of phrase. Anthony John Peters explains why Shakespeare’s coy use of metaphor was so effective — and may just help you get a date today.

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Diagnosing a zombie: Brain and body by Tim Verstynen & Bradley Voytek

Zombies eat brains. They are also, like all of us, driven by brain functions. What is happening in their brains to make them act as they do? In this intriguing dialogue, Tim Verstynen & Bradley Voytek apply the various human medical possibilities that make zombies…zombies.

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How tsunamis work by Alex Gendler.

The immense swell of a tsunami can grow up to 100 feet, hitting speeds over 500 mph — a treacherous combination for anyone or anything in its path. Alex Gendler details the causes of these towering terrors and explains how scientists are seeking to reduce their destruction in the future.

Celebrate 400 Years of Shakespeare

Newsletters, Video Highlights

Othello

William Shakespeare’s Othello is a timeless story about race, love, jealousy and betrayal.

As you like it

“All the world’s a stage And all the men and women merely players”.

All’s well that ends well

Helen’s got it bad for Bertram and she’ll do anything to get him (like cure the king of France’s gross skin disease for a chance to choose any husband she wants). The problem is that Bertram’s not into Helen. At all.

Loves Labour Lost

Let fame, that all hunt after in their lives,
Live register’d upon our brazen tombs
And then grace us in the disgrace of death;
When, spite of cormorant devouring Time,
The endeavour of this present breath may buy
That honour which shall bate his scythe’s keen edge,
And make us heirs of all eternity.