TV4Education Video Learning Lessons

Saving Energy (Science Year 1,2 & 3)

SmartLessons, Video Highlights

Curriculum Code:

Light and sound are produced by a range of sources and can be sensed (ACSSU020) People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for their environment and living things (ACSHE022) People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for their environment and living things (ACSHE035)
Science knowledge helps people to understand the effect of their actions (ACSHE051)

Aim:

Students develop understanding of energy and how to save energy.

Preparing:

– Ask students about energy, what gives us energy?
– Sing a song or dance of high energy which will show good instructions on how to use up energy.
– Once complete ask students how they feel? Did you feel this way before we sung or danced?
– Explain energy, what uses it, how we use it? How we need to save it etc.
– Listen to the story ‘The Day Amy saved the World’ and then discuss what she did to save energy.

Presenting:

– Have students look at different energy uses around the home. Have students make a list of different items in the house that use energy. Open up the link below and look at the different items in Amy’s house that uses energy.
– Link: Amy’s Energy saving website. (Click on Amy’s House)
– Watch Eco Maths Clip – http://www.tv4education.com/SmartLibrary/SmartLibraryWeb/TitleView.html?BookID=151132.01

Applying:

– Have students use the link below to draw different items in their house that uses energy. Talk about ways we can reduce the energy used at home.
– Have students place this into their science books.
– Link: We can Save Energy

Links:

‘The Day Amy saved the World’
http://www.amysenergysave.com.au/storybook/index.html#/the-day- amy-helped- save-the- world
Amy’s Energy saving website.
http://www.amysenergysave.com.au/index.html
We can Save Energy doc.

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Tips and Tricks

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I Was There- The Great War Interviews

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

stijn-swinnen-259744-unsplashI Was There- The Great War Interviews is a fantastic resource for students studying World War I. Extrapolating upon the original 1964 documentary series The Great War, this documentary provides a deeper look at the original collation of 280 eyewitness interviews, with never-before-seen footage of both soldiers and civilians. Thus, it provides invaluable insight into the behemoth that is WWI.

It is often easy to become overwhelmed by the sheer scale of an event like WWI, whereas I Was There- The Great War Interviews offers a deeply personal perspective, with interviews from a broad range of primary sources, from celebrated author Mabel Lethbridge O.B.E, soldiers Sebastian C. Lang, Charles Carrington, Wilhelm Eisenthal, factory worker Katie Morter, and many more.  In addition to this, both the Allied and Central sides are represented, thus significantly minimising any inherent bias.

Whilst the overall strategic and historical outlines are not discussed in great detail, the documentary explores the human relations of the war, such as the methods of recruitment, be it women using white feathers to represent cowardice, propaganda posters, the utilisation of music hall stars like Vesta Tilley, pro-war effort music and film, etc., all designed to solicit enlistment. It also showcases the changing attitudes of towards the war, from the initial excitement and euphoria to the grim realisation of the horrors of the battlefield, with soldier Frank Brent stating that ‘…it (the war) required that we should live in animal conditions… inevitable that we would develop the animal characteristic of killing.’

Furthermore, the documentary successfully displays the disparity between soldiers and civilians, with former soldier Charles Carrington stating ‘one was seemingly annoyed by their (civilians) attempts to sympathise… which only really reflects that they didn’t understand at all’, whilst Mabel Lethbridge noted a ‘…a strange lack of ability to communicate… to tell us (civilians) what it was really like… They were restless at home… They didn’t want to stay home. They wanted to get back.’

The battlefield is displayed as a kind of microcosm, running from being ‘an inferno’, with the apparent need to ‘exact retribution’ from the enemy, to the Easter and Christmas armistices and the ‘deceptive peace’ that fraternisation with the enemy brought, with men singing together in the trenches, exchanging gifts and addresses for after the war.  The documentary aims to explore multiple facets of the human experience of the Great War, recognising that to focus on only one would be to vastly limit its representation of this vast moment in history.

I Was There- The Great War Interviews proves to be a deeply personal look at a time in history that has deeply rooted itself in our collective psyche. The utilisation of such a wide range of primary sources will certainly be of interest to students and assist in broadening their understanding of WWI.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources that can be used in relation to the topics covered in this post. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education just search for the titles below on your site.

I Was There- The Great War Interviews

Lest We Forget What- The Commemoration of WW1 and the ANZAC Legend

100 Years of ANZAC: The Spirit Lives 2014-2018, World War 1, Conscription (S01E21)

The Panzer

World War I’s Tunnels of Death- The Killing Fields (S01E01)

14 Diaries of the Great War- Into the Abyss (S01E01)

The War that Changed Us- Answering the Call (S01E01)

 

Fry’s Planet Word: Babel

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

patrick-tomasso-71909-unsplashWhat is the value of language? Indeed, why is it something that we study, or devote the slightest iota of attention to? ‘Babel’, the first episode of Fry’s Planet Word, presented by Stephen Fry, explores this very notion, focussing upon the origins of language as a uniquely human concept, helping both teachers and students to gain a greater understanding of this foundational method of communication and thus obtain a greater appreciation, both of its importance and how it continues to shift and develop over time.

At its root, language is the grounding method of communication, but it does far more than that, with the acquisition and development of our utilisation of language being, according to Fry, ‘the most complex bit of brain processing that we know of.’ It goes beyond an animalistic need to communicate fear, hunger, danger, etc., becoming a nuanced social medium that differentiates vastly from person to person based upon a multitude of factors: the particular language you speak, the breadth of your personal vocabulary and manner in which you use it, the register that you use, whether or not in is appropriate to use idioms and colloquialisms regarding the situation, the list goes on and on. In short, language is something that uniquely identifies us, but also allows us to find commonality and communicate with those around us.

At present, there are approximately 7,000 languages in use today, varying from a handful of users, to over a billion. Whilst many of these languages differentiate in their conception of sentence structure, complexity, breadth of vocabulary, whether or not they are vocalised (in the case of sign language), the vast majority are made up of the same basic components: nouns, to identify things; adjectives, to describe them; verbs, to tell you what they do. It is from the use of these building blocks that much of what we identify as being a uniquely human quality springs from, a sinuous and consistently changing lens through which our worldview is shaped, in addition to allowing other people to share in our perspective.

Fry demonstrates the pervasive and fundamental nature of language in ‘Babel’ through a myriad of ways: the initial acquisition of language as the documentary tracks 15 month old Ruby over a one year period, philology, the comparisons between the Turkana language and English, how communication methods between animals are vastly different than those explored in humans, the determining factors on if a language flourishes or dies out, how our brains are affected by language use, and many other topics.

‘Babel’ proves to be an informative and uniquely insightful glance into the value of language and how it underpins so much of our daily lives, and will prove to be of particular interest to English and Language students as a supplement to their primary studies.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources that can be used in relation to the topics covered in this post. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education just search for the titles below on your site.

Fry’s Planet Word- Babel (S01E01)

The Sound of Aus (2007) 

TED-ED Lessons Worth Sharing- The Controversial Origins of the Encyclopedia

How I’m Discovering the Secrets of Ancient Texts

 

Shakespeare For Today

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

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William Shakespeare is undoubtedly one of the greatest playwrights in history, and likely the best known. His work is still broadly studied and performed worldwide, more than four centuries after his death- so how has his work acquired a stereotype of being fusty, irrelevant and difficult to decipher?

Whether or not you are aware of it, Shakespeare’s work has cemented itself in the collective conscience of our society. For example, look at these common sayings and idioms: a foregone conclusion, a sea change, a sorry sight, dead as a doornail, all’s well that ends well, be all and end all, foul play, green eyed monster, hot-blooded, a charmed life, lie low, in a pickle, in stitches, I have not slept a wink, night owl, up in arms, woe is me, wild goose chase– the list goes on and on. What do these have in common? They were all originally coined by Shakespeare.

Perhaps one of the greatest errors in the study of his work is to concentrate solely upon the transcriptions of his plays: Shakespeare counted himself as a playwright, and thus his plays are designed to be performed to an audience as a visual medium, and not limited to the page. Given a performance of his work, the cadences of language and utilisation of techniques such as metaphor and iambic pentameter immediately become apparent to students, opening up the apparent barriers between our modern English and that of Shakespeare’s day. This allows students to better utilise their knowledge of the themes and motifs being explored within his work, rather than being bogged down by individual stanzas, without understanding the broader context of the act, or indeed the piece as a whole.

Indeed, perhaps the reason Shakespeare has been such an enduring influence upon our society is due to the commonality of the human experience that is explored within his work. Whether you are studying works as fanciful as the comedy A Midsummer Night’s Dream or the romance The Tempest, his histories or his tragedies, they are all rooted in the tribulations, the joys, the melancholy and the general experience of what it is to be human. Love, loss, revenge and political intrigue are all common threads within his work, and it is largely for this reason that Shakespeare has stood the test of time- think of any popular film, television series, book or popular culture phenomenon, past or present, and they will likely be grounded in at least one of these things. Shakespeare was considered a vastly accessible playwright in his time, with every class coming to view his work. To be accessible to so many, he had to tap into the commonality between them all.

Another common error in studying his work is to purely view Shakespeare’s work through our own 21st century lens, without consideration for the historical, social and political context in which he was writing in. The culmination of this is often a sense of isolation and irrelevance on the part of students, or a complete misrepresentation of the original themes, such as an overt attachment of colonialist overtones to The Tempest. Whilst the universality of his plays and the exploration of our current context is an important addition to any textual study, it is just as vitally important to hold in consideration the viewpoints and broader context that Shakespeare was writing in.

As has been established, it is a necessity to study Shakespeare using a range of methods and angles, in order to better consolidate our understanding and bring his work to life. Here at TV4Education, we have a vast collection of material to better assist with this. Be it the fantastic Shakespeare Uncovered series, that delves into the context that Shakespeare wrote the play in whilst also examining how it the work continues to evolve, its relevance in today’s society, and the different facets that are explored by different actors, productions and scholars; or Lenny Henry Finding Shakespeare, a witty, down-to-earth look at how Shakespeare was originally for everybody, how this has changed over time, and how to rectify this; or the numerous of productions of his work in our collection, from Richard II, Othello, Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest and many more.

Whilst close study of the written text is an important facet, viewing Shakespeare in action and accessing  a variety of perspectives through the medium of multimedia will prove to be an invaluable tool and addition to the classroom. The amalgamation of these learning techniques will foster an increased appreciation of Shakespeare’s work, something that will be enjoyed for years to come.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources that can be used in relation to the topics covered in this post. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education just search for the titles below on your site.

Shakespeare Uncovered – Series

Lenny Henry Finding Shakespeare

The Taming of The Shrew

Romeo and Juliet

Shakespeare Animated – Series

Horrible Histories Special Sensational Shakespeare

Othello

Hamlet

Insults by Shakespeare

Relates to Australian Curriculum Codes;

ACHAH070, ACDSEH059, ACELA1500, ACHHS070, ACHHS086, ACHHS124

My Life in Year 7 – with full Study Guides

SmartLessons, Video Highlights

The whiz kids behind “My life in year 12” are bringing out a new series –

My life in year 7.

This time you and your students will be able to explore many themes that affect students transitioning from primary school to high school. Puberty, making friends, study load, expectations and home life are all explored in a very real way.

Once again, Princess Pictures, have graciously provided full study guides to help you get the best out of your students while watching the program. You can download the study guide by clicking here or search for “my year 7 life” on TV4Education.

The series will be airing on ABC – and you can get every episode as soon as it becomes available through TV4Education.

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New shows coming this week 28th August

Newsletters, Video Highlights

28/08/2017

Let’s take a look at what educational programs are on this week – rest assured that these programs will be available on TV4Education ad free shortly after they air on TV. (If they’re not already available).

Click here to see how easy it is to find and save the videos you want to use in the classroom.

Programs in Blue are from Free to air TV, Programs in Green are from Foxtel TV. All programs are available ad free to Australian Schools through TV4Education.


Monday


 

Diana – 20 Years On (History Channel)

20 years ago the world was devastated by the death of the “People’s Princess”, but her legacy lives on. [Classified PG]

*HOT TIP* Take a look at our other documentaries and movies about Diana’s life by searching for “Princess Diana”.
News & Documentaries | History | Humanitarian | Empathy | Monarchy | Media | Secondary | Influential People

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Full Proof – Plastic (ABC3 Channel)

Mona lives in Amsterdam and is worried about the plastic waste in her city. She finds plastic bottles and bags in the parks, on the streets and floating in the canals. She wants to find out what plastic is and why it shouldn’t end up in the environment. So she starts to experiment. She melts plastic, she molds plastic, she makes a beautiful vase with plastic and she finds out how she can use plastic waste to stop the plastic problem in Amsterdam. [Classified G]

Science | Chemistry | STEM | Experiments | Secondary | Primary

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History’s Secrets – Atomic Bomb (History Channel)

Especially in this tense political climate, you have to wonder, how are atomic bombs so accessible? [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | History | Conflict | War | Science | Politics | Secondary

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Australian Story – Cracking Up (ABC1 Channel)

Comedian Sami Shah and psychologist Ishma Alvi left behind turmoil in Pakistan to give their young daughter a better life in Australia. When they ended up in a small country town in Western Australia, it was not the dream they’d imagined. Ishma found work in a detention centre and unemployed Sami hit the comedy circuit, poking fun at his new town of Northam, rousing the ire of some residents. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | Modern Australia | Comedy | Inspirational | Cultural Understanding | Journalism| Interview | Human Interest | Secondary

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Russia’s War: Blood Upon the Snow – The Cult Of Personality (s01e10) (History Channel)

Stalin’s game plan is particularly selfish at the end of World War II. [Classified M]

News & Documentaries | History | Secondary | War | Conflict | Secondary

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Science Max: Experiments at Large (s01e09) (ABC3 Channel)

Phil gives himself super strength using the power of simple machines to move, lift and roll a machine he could barely budge otherwise. Plus, lift yourself with one finger and watch cavemen discover the wheel. [Classified G]

Science | Design | Biology| Experiments | History| Primary

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Maiko – Dancing Child (Arts Channel)

Being a ballerina is one of the world’s most tough, competitive and painful jobs – but imagine starting a family at the same time. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | People & Culture |Arts | Dancing | Careers | Family | Stereotypes | Secondary | Performance Arts

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Chemistry Challenges And Solutions – The Behaviour Of Atoms: Phases Of Matter And The Properties Of Gases (s01e02) (ABC3 Channel)

Fundamentally, chemistry is the science of interacting particles. This unit covers the properties of solids, liquids, and gases in terms of the behaviour of invisible particles of matter that interact at the atomic scale. [Classified G]

Science | Gases | Chemistry| Experiments | Atoms | Matter | Primary

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Tuesday


 

Years of Living Dangerously – Uprising (s02e08) (National Geographic Channel)

America Ferrera meets activists in the US trying to shut down coal plants, while Sigourney Weaver investigates the impact that China’s pollution is having on the global environment. [Classified M]

News & Documentaries | People & Culture | Environmental Studies | Science | Climate Change | Global Warming | STEM | Secondary

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The House With Annabel Crabb (s01e04) (ABC1 Channel)

Annabel steps into the intoxicating world of the Senate, presided over by Senate President Stephen Parry (a former cop and undertaker) and his Clerk Rosemary Laing, an expert in 17th-century British poetry. [Classified G]

News & Documentaries |Politics | Canberra | Australia | Australian History | Secondary

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Soup Cans & Superstars (Arts Channel)

Alastair Sooke champions pop art as one of the most important art forms of the 20th-century, peeling back pops frothy, ironic surface to reveal an art style full of subversive wit and radical ideas. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | People & Culture | Arts | Secondary | Creativity

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Catalyst – Closing In, The Hunt For Alien Life (ABC1 Channel)

Will we soon find evidence of alien life? Scientists are currently in the throes of an unprecedented search for ET – and an answer to this long-pondered question may come sooner than you think. [Classified G]

News & Documentaries |Science| Technologies | STEM| Space Science | Secondary

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The Truth Behind – King Arthur (s01e05) (National Geographic Channel)

Camelot. The Round Table. Excalibur. Are these stories historical fact or ancient fiction? Experts debunk the tale of King Arthur, one of the world’s most popular and enduring legends. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | History | Iconic People| Secondary

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The Handmaid’s Tale – Late (s01e03) (SBS Channel)

Offred visits Janine’s baby with Serena Joy and remembers the early days of the revolution before Gilead. Ofglen faces a difficult challenge. [Classified MA15+]

Drama |TV Series| Literature| Acting | Secondary

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Dr Karl’s Outrageous Acts of Science (s01e10) (Discovery Channel)

Dr Karl Kruszelnicki uncovers the principles behind some mind-boggling experiments, extraordinary inventions and jaw dropping scientific stunts. [Classified PG]

| News & Documentaries | Science & Technology | Physics | Chemistry | STEM | Secondary

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Wednesday


 

Starting Up, Starting Over (s01e04) (Lifestyle Channel)

Hani and Sarah are turning their backs on their comfortable suburban lives in South West London. The couple and their two young children move 100 miles up to the Malvern Hills. They are putting all their life savings into building their own Brewery to sell their own beer with no previous experience in the industry between them. [Classified PG]

Entertainment | Lifestyle & Documentaries | Jobs | Careers | Work Studies | Small Business | Business Studies | Marketing | Start Up | Secondary

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Land Speed Heroes (s01e01) (Discovery Turbo Channel)

Get set for an action-packed hour as professional and amateur speed freaks try to set land speed records on Utah’s famous Bonneville Salt Flats. From hot rod-racing soccer mums to jaw-dropping streamliners and everything in between, get your kicks with these adrenaline junkies. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | Science & Technology | Technology | Design | Mechanics | Cars | STEM | Secondary

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Thursday


 

Enemy Of The Reich (History Channel)

In 1943, Noor Khan was recruited as a covert operative into Churchill’s Special Operations. Khan became the only radio operator linking the British to the French Resistance, co-ordinating the airdrop of weapons and rescue of agents. [Classified M]

News & Documentaries | History | Secondary

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Rachel Hunter’s Tour Of Beauty – Hawaii (s02e05) (Lifestyle YOU Channel)

In Hawaii, Rachel learns that the Hawaiian secrets to health and beauty are intrinsically connected to nature. Oils, scrubs and flowers provide that Hawaiian glow. [Classified PG]

Entertainment | Lifestyle & Documentaries | Cultural Understanding | Mental Health | Health and PE | Self-Esteem | Self Care | Secondary

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Friday


 

Brain Games – Animal Vs Human (s04e16) (National Geographic Channel)

It’s going to be heads versus tails as we pit humans against animals in a series of unique competitions. If you play along, you’ll find out how a bird can eat like a horse and how a chimp can make you look like a chump. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | Science & Technology | Science | Human Brain | The Human Body | Psychology | Secondary | Upper Primary

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Graceful Girls (Arts Channel)

Primary school teacher Brianna Lee takes one last shot at fulfilling her lifelong dream, of winning Calisthenics’ most prestigious title, ‘Most Graceful Girl’. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | People & Culture | Arts | Performance Arts | Sports Training | Health and PE | Secondary | Upper Primary

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TV4Education – Training Series

Tips and Tricks, training, Video Highlights

tv4ed 3 part training series(1)

***The series will be broadcast on youtube live. Why? Everyone has access to youtube – even if your school blocks youtube you will be able to watch from home or on your own device. Our training videos will be short and sweet so this way you can be ready to watch straight away – without waiting for any apps or downloads to be able to view the session.

What it will cover and who should watch – Learn everything there is to know about the NEW TV4Education. Now in Smartsuite, TV4Education has more features and add ons than ever before – AND it’s easier to use. If you’re a Teacher, Library Team Member, IT, Head of Learning or Principal, this series is for you.

Register here for our training series. We will verify the school you are from and then you will be sent the links to the newest available training video.

If you’re not already following our youtube channel – please do go ahead and subscribe – that way you’ll be the first to see any new video updates and announcements on TV4Education. You can also subscribe to our Functional Solutions page here.

The Record Breakers

Newsletters, Video Highlights

What does it mean to win Gold?

With the opening ceremony of the 2016 Olympics we wait in anticipation as we see if the limits of human ability is once again shattered.

The 4 minute mile was said to be impossible for humans, but since Roger Bannister showed that is was possible thousands even people still in high school have been able to achieve this.

We celebrate those who broke the records, some born with super human abilities and others who had super human dedication and drive. Share these stories with your students and tell them what some call impossible others are training to show it is.

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Cool Runnings (1993) The true story about four Jamaicans planning to compete as bobsled racers at the Winter Olympics

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Chariots Of Fire – (1982) Two British track athletes, one a determined Jew and the other a devout Christian, compete in the 1924 Olympics.

Team USA celebrates "the Miracle on Ice"

MIRACLE (2014) Miracle tells the true story of Herb Brooks (Russell), the player-turned-coach who led the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team to victory over the seemingly invincible Russian squad.

 

OLY 1984  EDWIN MOSES

Sporting Greats – Edwin Moses Edwin Moses won 107 consecutive finals, set the world record in the 400m hurdles event four times and won a gold medal at the 1976 and 1984 Olympics.

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Sporting Greats – Nadia Comaneci Nadia Comaneci winner of five Olympic gold medals at the 1976 and the 1980 Olympics and is the first female gymnast to be awarded a perfect score of 10 in an Olympic gymnastic event.

Want to view the full newsletter? Click HERE

Naidoc Week

Newsletters, Video Highlights

NAIDOC celebrations are held around Australia each July to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The week is celebrated not just in the Indigenous communities but also in increasing numbers of government agencies, schools, local councils and workplaces.

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First Australians – They Have Come To Stay

This landmark series chronicles the birth of contemporary Australia as never told before, from the perspective of its first people. It explores what unfolds when the oldest living culture in the world is overrun by the world’s greatest empire, and depicts the true stories of individuals – both black and white. The story begins in 1788 in Sydney with the friendship between an Englishmen, Governor Phillip, and a warrior, Bennelong.

Part 1 of 7

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art + soul – Home and Away

Art + Soul explores the diversity of Indigenous culture through three themes – home and away, dreams and nightmares and bitter and sweet. Drawing on key works from the Gallery’s collection, it reveals the myriad of contemporary artistic expressions that evidence the enduring heritage of Indigenous Australia, in all its diversity and complexity.

Part 1 of 3

Animated traditional stories explained by the Elders including the Dolphin NSW and the Wanka Manapulpa Minyma, WA
Animated traditional stories explained by the Elders including the Dolphin NSW and the Wanka Manapulpa Minyma, WA

 

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Manganinnie

Through Lyrical images, Manganinnie journeys across mountains towards the coast with Joanna, a white girl, in search of Manganinnie’s vanished tribe. The poignancy of this film derives from the Aboriginal woman’s gradual realization that her people and the tribal way of life are forever gone. It is the story of the Black Drive of 1830, the attempted genocide of the Tasmanian Aborigines.

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Anzacs Remembering Our Heroes

Anzacs – Remembering our heroes is a series of 15 minute documentary specials, produced by NITV to pay tribute to the military efforts of Indigenous people.

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Colour Theory – Teho Ropeyarn

From the northernmost tip of far north Queensland, Teho Ropeyarn’s bold prints have traversed Australia, winning awards and representing the distinctive culture of the Torres Strait Islands.

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Lurujarri Dreaming

This beautifully crafted animated documentary retraces the Lurujarri Dreaming Trail from the Goolarabooloo community in the Western Kimberley region of Western Australia.

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Cleverman (s01e01)

A series of unexplained violent attacks in the city are blamed on the newly discovered ‘Hairypeople’, who have been living and passing among us, without our knowledge.

Part 1 of 6

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Songlines – Footprints

Footprints is a film of the story, dance and culture of the Djugun people that has been brought to life from the dirt after 50 years, handed back to the Djugun people from its caretaker Roy Wiggan

Part 1 of 12

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Jandamarra’s War

The story of an Australian Aboriginal man who should be as famous as Ned Kelly. In 1894, Jandamarra led a three year rebellion against invading pastoralists in defence of his people’s ancient land and culture.

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The Chant Of Jimmie Blacksmith (1978)

Jimmie Blacksmith (Tommy Lewis), a man of half-Aboriginal ancestry, is pushed to the breaking point by the racist oppression perpetrated by the British in their rule of Australia in 1900, and by his inability to acclimate to Western culture. Raised in a white Christian family but never recognized by white individuals as their equal, Blacksmith undergoes frequent humiliations that provoke a violent response when he brutally murders his employer’s family.

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Walkabout (1971)

Under the pretense of having a picnic, a geologist (John Meillon) takes his teenage daughter (Jenny Agutter) and 6-year-old son (Lucien John) into the Australian outback and attempts to shoot them. When he fails, he turns the gun on himself, and the two city-bred children must contend with harsh wilderness alone. They are saved by a chance encounter with an Aborigine boy (David Gulpilil) who shows them how to survive, and in the process underscores the disharmony between nature and modern life.