Metropolis (1927)

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

timothy-eberly-382663-unsplashFritz Lang’s 1927 film Metropolis was ground breaking in many ways. At the time, it was the most expensive German film ever made, costing over 5 million reichsmarks and taking 17 months to film, nearly financially capsizing the production studio, UFA. As one of the first feature length science fiction films ever made, Metropolis is an expansive story that is renowned even today for its extravagant scenery, art direction, cinematography and utilisation of German expressionist techniques. At its original run time of 153 minutes, it was one of the longest films made, contributing to its initial financial failure, as it required over four kilometres of film to run it, a weighty investment for any theatre. With the science fiction genre as we know it today still largely being defined in this era (Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, often considered the first work of science fiction, was published in 1818), it was a difficult film to categorise and advertise. Indeed, an advertisement from New Zealand reads ‘See it! Try to describe it!’ Nonetheless, it has since become recognised as a highly influential film, becoming the first film to be inscribed on UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register in 2001, and is widely studied in schools today for both its historical context as part of the Weimar Republic, an example of early science fiction, German Expressionism and the utilisation of the silent film genre.

The film was accompanied by a novelisation, published in 1925 by director Fritz Lang’s then-wife and credited screenwriter, Thea von Harbou. However, it was the film that really made an impact, with many praising its technical prowess whilst simultaneously lambasting it as being overlong and overwrought. Mordaunt Hall of the New York Times called it “a technical marvel with feet of clay”, whilst renowned sci-fi author H.G Wells criticised the film as being rampant with “foolishness, cliché, platitude and muddlement about mechanical progress and progress in general.” Regardless of these criticisms, Metropolis has undoubtedly had an impact upon contemporary science fiction, with as film critic Roger Ebert stated “from this film in various ways, descended not only ‘Dark City’, but ‘Blade Runner’, ‘The Fifth Element’, ‘Alphaville’, Escape From L.A’, ‘Gattaca’ and Batman’s Gotham City… Rotwang created the visual look of mad scientists for decades to come, especially after it was mirrored in ‘The Bride of Frankenstein’… the device of the ‘false Maria’… inspired the ‘Replicants’ of ‘Blade Runner.’” It was one of the first examples of the dystopia / utopia theme in science fiction, something that has continued to be explored (e.g.: 1984, Brave New World, Never Let Me Go, The Matrix, etc.) and has seen a resurgence in recent years.

The film’s most famous quote, “the mediator between head and hands must be the heart” reverberates throughout the entire film, with Metropolis demonstrating a schism between the upper and lower classes. In this case it is literal, with the lower classes living underground and the upper classes living amongst the sprawling excess of the city, overshadowed by their monolithic buildings, which are a combination of the grandeur of Greco-Roman architecture and luxe, geometric (harking back to the streamlined appearance of machines) Art Deco. Indeed, the sets appear to dwarf the actors, with the machines and the structures taking visual precedence. This is exemplified when Freder imagines one of the machines as Moloch, a Canaanite god / idol that required child sacrifice that is referenced in Leviticus. This precedence of machines is rectified by the end of the film, but this also highlights Lang’s propensity for biblical allusions throughout the film- the tower of Babel, the idolatress of Babylon and the beast with seven heads, Maria as a virtuous Mary figure preaching to the workers, Freder as a Christlike mediator between above and below, the gardens as a reference to Eden, etc. This lends the story gravity and also helped in creating a grounding point for the audience, references that they were familiar with amongst the fantastical landscape Lang presented.

Metropolis was released during the ‘golden era’ of the Weimar Republic, a brief period of stability and prosperity in Germany, prior to World War II. With a permanent currency implemented in 1923 and the Dawes Plan in 1924, it sparked a cultural renaissance, born in the wake of World War I, the immense hyperinflation and the influence of the cultural development in the Soviet Union. Innovations in German cinema, literature, architecture (particularly Bauhaus), film, art and theatre came to the forefront, with a fascination with the ‘ultramodern’ in addition to the mediums of cabaret and jazz and an overall differentiation from more traditional German values- an influence that is certainly explored in Metropolis. There was a certain contention between the pull of traditional values versus the influence of globalisation and the influx of other cultures, particularly America (via American films and fashion), with Americanisation progressing largely due to the Dawes Plan.

German Expressionism was at its peak during this time, with Metropolis being a prime example. It was more concerned with the evocation of a particular mood and aimed to show a highly subjective view of the world, as compared to the strict realism and somewhat detached perspective of art and film previously. This internal perspective was highly effective and necessary in silent film, given the absence of audible dialogue. This was characterised by evocative lighting (particularly via chiaroscuro, obviously highlighting certain objects / characters and casting others in shadow) and utilising different camera angles and perspectives. In the post World War I environment, there was an increased fascination with the human psyche, madness and the question of identity, as life as most people knew it had been irrevocably shifted.

Metropolis is a highly influential film that is broadly studied today. Whether you are exclusively studying the film or the Weimar Republic, 20th century Germany, the development of silent film or the consolidation of the science fiction genre, it is an important piece of culture that is still highly relevant.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources in relation to this subject. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education, just search for the titles below on your site:

Metropolis (Movie 1927)

German Expressionism: Crash Course Film History #7

Fritz Lang Interviewed by William Friedkin (1974)

The Silent Era: Crash Course Film History #9

The History of Cinema- Silent Era

BBC Paul Mertons Weird and Wonderful World of Early Cinema

Generation War (Part One)

Dawes Plan

Ten Minute History- The Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany (Short Documentary)

The Great Depression: Crash Course US History #33

 

 

Designing a productive garden (Science year 4 & 5)

SmartLessons, Video Highlights

Curriculum Code:

Living things, including plants and animals, depend on each other and the environment to survive (ACSSU073)

Scientific knowledge is used to inform personal and community decisions (ACSHE217)

Aim:

Increase students design and scientific skills as they design a school yard productive garden.

Preparing:

– Discuss the students understanding of a ‘productive garden’. What is a productive garden? How can we create one? When thinking about a garden and its crops what do we need to consider.
– Use the IWB link to help make a list of these concerns.

Link: Growing A Productive Garden

Presenting:

Search TV4Education for “Gardening Australia ACSSU073” and watch clip from 13:54 till 19:05.

– Discuss the issues that were brought up about the need for a community garden.

Add them to the list created above in ‘Growing a productive garden’.

Applying:

– Help place students into pairs and set them the task of designing their own productive garden. Students will need to show its size and the different types of plants and animals they will include.

– Draw the garden and surrounding buildings, walkways and water in order to show it’s area in the school.

– They will also need to be able to instruct others how their garden is productive.

This lesson could be a great lead up to a science project, using research tools students would be able to design and justify the reasons for their garden design and choice of animals and plants.

*Links:

Growing a Productive garden doc.

TV4Education Video Learning Lessons

Saving Energy (Science Year 1,2 & 3)

SmartLessons, Video Highlights

Curriculum Code:

Light and sound are produced by a range of sources and can be sensed (ACSSU020) People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for their environment and living things (ACSHE022) People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for their environment and living things (ACSHE035)
Science knowledge helps people to understand the effect of their actions (ACSHE051)

Aim:

Students develop understanding of energy and how to save energy.

Preparing:

– Ask students about energy, what gives us energy?
– Sing a song or dance of high energy which will show good instructions on how to use up energy.
– Once complete ask students how they feel? Did you feel this way before we sung or danced?
– Explain energy, what uses it, how we use it? How we need to save it etc.
– Listen to the story ‘The Day Amy saved the World’ and then discuss what she did to save energy.

Presenting:

– Have students look at different energy uses around the home. Have students make a list of different items in the house that use energy. Open up the link below and look at the different items in Amy’s house that uses energy.
– Link: Amy’s Energy saving website. (Click on Amy’s House)
– Watch Eco Maths Clip – http://www.tv4education.com/SmartLibrary/SmartLibraryWeb/TitleView.html?BookID=151132.01

Applying:

– Have students use the link below to draw different items in their house that uses energy. Talk about ways we can reduce the energy used at home.
– Have students place this into their science books.
– Link: We can Save Energy

Links:

‘The Day Amy saved the World’
http://www.amysenergysave.com.au/storybook/index.html#/the-day- amy-helped- save-the- world
Amy’s Energy saving website.
http://www.amysenergysave.com.au/index.html
We can Save Energy doc.

The Renaissance

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

eric-terrade-8615-unsplashThe Renaissance is one of the most fascinating and innovative periods in history, and also one of the most hotly debated. There is much contention as to whether or not it can really be considered, as the term Renaissance suggests, a ‘rebirth’ of society, following the Middle Ages, especially with its deep roots and harking back to Greco-Roman classicism, two empires that were recognised as having ‘fallen’ almost a thousand years previously. Additionally, there is also debate as to whether or not it was a series of independent discoveries and philosophies made over several centuries (the Renaissance is commonly agreed to have been between c. 14th-17th centuries A.D) as opposed to a centralised movement. Regardless of one’s position on the matter, the Renaissance gave birth to some of the most innovative works of art, literature, architecture, inventions and discoveries in science and medicine that the world has seen since.

Originating in Florence, Italy, the Renaissance spread over the majority of Europe in the following centuries. It was grounded in the philosophy of humanism, which largely sought to hark back to the values of classical Greece and Rome, aiming to create a people group that were educated and literate, capable of utilising the studies of the humanities (e.g. philosophy, history, poetry, rhetoric, etc.) for the betterment of their broader society, rather than it being an elusive mark of status. It was the idea of humanism that largely birthed the popular idea of the ‘Renaissance man’- one that was well versed in everything from literature to art, Greek and Roman myths, science, history, theology, engineering and even stonemasonry, as opposed to focusing all their attention upon their designated trade. This Renaissance ideal is epitomised in many of the icons of the era, à la Galileo, Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. Da Vinci, for example, whilst likely best known as a painter, also considered himself a philosopher, engineer, sculptor, engineer, architect and more, whilst Michelangelo was also an architect and poet in addition to being a renowned sculptor and painter, with a keen interest in anatomy. There was a central ideology of this ‘whole’ education informing every aspect of their lives and working practice as opposed to a more isolated focus.

The Renaissance period is perhaps most commonly renowned for its art, after all, it is responsible for masterpieces such as the ‘Mona Lisa’, Michelangelo’s ‘David’, ‘The Last Supper’, Botticelli’s ‘The Birth of Venus’ and many more. There was a huge elevation in the status of the artist during this period, largely due to patronage from wealthy clients such as the Medici and Borgia families. The influence of humanism is evident in much of the art, with artist’s knowledge of mathematics, anatomy, architecture, etc. vastly developing art in a way that had not  previously been widespread. Additionally, the ideals and newfound fascination with classicism’s interest in accurate anatomy and fascination with the physical form partnered with the religious influence and monetary support of the Church paved the way for many masterpieces on a scale never before seen in history, obvious in works such as Michelangelo’s ‘David’, ‘Pieta’ and Sistine Chapel Ceiling. The grandeur of religion was fully fledged and the asceticism previously demonstrated in Christianity largely fell from favour, at least in regards to art and architecture.

Whilst the period may be most commonly renowned for its contributions to art and architecture, it also gave birth to some incredibly revolutionary inventions: the printing press, the mechanical clock, the telescope, the microscope, eyeglasses, the barometer, italics, the violin, the anemometer, the list goes on. In short, the Renaissance undoubtedly shaped our cultural view of the modern world as we know it, be it Galileo’s radical advances in astronomy or Gutenberg’s printing press.

The Renaissance period is one of the most influential times in history, arguably being a catalyst for the world as we know it today. Its effect is visible in almost every field and subject, with the explorations of art, science, literature and more largely forming the foundation for contemporary culture in the West. Whilst it may be more explicitly studied in art or history, knowledge of the Renaissance period will undoubtedly benefit any students understanding of their subject.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources in relation to this subject. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education, just search for the titles below on your site:

The Renaissance Unchained- God, Myths and Oil Paints (S01E01)

Italy Unpacked

Self Portraits of the Me Generation- Togetherness (S01E01)

Great Scientists- Galileo

Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man of Math

Inside the Mind of Leonardo

The Caravaggio Affair

The Nude in Art with Tim Marlow, The Renaissance, EP2

Bronzino Restoring Genius

Masterpieces of the Hermitage Raphael, Da Vinci & The High Italian Renaissance S01 E11

Masterpieces of the Hermitage Art of the Early Italian Renaissance S1 E10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jurassic Park 25th Anniversary

Newsletters, SmartLessons

25 Years ago on this day, Jurassic Park was released to the world, sending chills down the spines of some and excited the imaginations of others. What are the limits of technology?

Will we see extinct animals come back to life in our lifetimes?

You can watch all the movies here.

Jurassic Park (1993)giphy (78)

The Lost World Jurassic Park II

giphy (78)

Jurassic Park III (2001)

giphy (78)

Jurassic World (2015)

giphy (78)

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New shows coming this week 28th August

Newsletters, Video Highlights

28/08/2017

Let’s take a look at what educational programs are on this week – rest assured that these programs will be available on TV4Education ad free shortly after they air on TV. (If they’re not already available).

Click here to see how easy it is to find and save the videos you want to use in the classroom.

Programs in Blue are from Free to air TV, Programs in Green are from Foxtel TV. All programs are available ad free to Australian Schools through TV4Education.


Monday


 

Diana – 20 Years On (History Channel)

20 years ago the world was devastated by the death of the “People’s Princess”, but her legacy lives on. [Classified PG]

*HOT TIP* Take a look at our other documentaries and movies about Diana’s life by searching for “Princess Diana”.
News & Documentaries | History | Humanitarian | Empathy | Monarchy | Media | Secondary | Influential People

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Full Proof – Plastic (ABC3 Channel)

Mona lives in Amsterdam and is worried about the plastic waste in her city. She finds plastic bottles and bags in the parks, on the streets and floating in the canals. She wants to find out what plastic is and why it shouldn’t end up in the environment. So she starts to experiment. She melts plastic, she molds plastic, she makes a beautiful vase with plastic and she finds out how she can use plastic waste to stop the plastic problem in Amsterdam. [Classified G]

Science | Chemistry | STEM | Experiments | Secondary | Primary

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History’s Secrets – Atomic Bomb (History Channel)

Especially in this tense political climate, you have to wonder, how are atomic bombs so accessible? [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | History | Conflict | War | Science | Politics | Secondary

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Australian Story – Cracking Up (ABC1 Channel)

Comedian Sami Shah and psychologist Ishma Alvi left behind turmoil in Pakistan to give their young daughter a better life in Australia. When they ended up in a small country town in Western Australia, it was not the dream they’d imagined. Ishma found work in a detention centre and unemployed Sami hit the comedy circuit, poking fun at his new town of Northam, rousing the ire of some residents. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | Modern Australia | Comedy | Inspirational | Cultural Understanding | Journalism| Interview | Human Interest | Secondary

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Russia’s War: Blood Upon the Snow – The Cult Of Personality (s01e10) (History Channel)

Stalin’s game plan is particularly selfish at the end of World War II. [Classified M]

News & Documentaries | History | Secondary | War | Conflict | Secondary

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Science Max: Experiments at Large (s01e09) (ABC3 Channel)

Phil gives himself super strength using the power of simple machines to move, lift and roll a machine he could barely budge otherwise. Plus, lift yourself with one finger and watch cavemen discover the wheel. [Classified G]

Science | Design | Biology| Experiments | History| Primary

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Maiko – Dancing Child (Arts Channel)

Being a ballerina is one of the world’s most tough, competitive and painful jobs – but imagine starting a family at the same time. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | People & Culture |Arts | Dancing | Careers | Family | Stereotypes | Secondary | Performance Arts

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Chemistry Challenges And Solutions – The Behaviour Of Atoms: Phases Of Matter And The Properties Of Gases (s01e02) (ABC3 Channel)

Fundamentally, chemistry is the science of interacting particles. This unit covers the properties of solids, liquids, and gases in terms of the behaviour of invisible particles of matter that interact at the atomic scale. [Classified G]

Science | Gases | Chemistry| Experiments | Atoms | Matter | Primary

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Tuesday


 

Years of Living Dangerously – Uprising (s02e08) (National Geographic Channel)

America Ferrera meets activists in the US trying to shut down coal plants, while Sigourney Weaver investigates the impact that China’s pollution is having on the global environment. [Classified M]

News & Documentaries | People & Culture | Environmental Studies | Science | Climate Change | Global Warming | STEM | Secondary

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The House With Annabel Crabb (s01e04) (ABC1 Channel)

Annabel steps into the intoxicating world of the Senate, presided over by Senate President Stephen Parry (a former cop and undertaker) and his Clerk Rosemary Laing, an expert in 17th-century British poetry. [Classified G]

News & Documentaries |Politics | Canberra | Australia | Australian History | Secondary

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Soup Cans & Superstars (Arts Channel)

Alastair Sooke champions pop art as one of the most important art forms of the 20th-century, peeling back pops frothy, ironic surface to reveal an art style full of subversive wit and radical ideas. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | People & Culture | Arts | Secondary | Creativity

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Catalyst – Closing In, The Hunt For Alien Life (ABC1 Channel)

Will we soon find evidence of alien life? Scientists are currently in the throes of an unprecedented search for ET – and an answer to this long-pondered question may come sooner than you think. [Classified G]

News & Documentaries |Science| Technologies | STEM| Space Science | Secondary

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The Truth Behind – King Arthur (s01e05) (National Geographic Channel)

Camelot. The Round Table. Excalibur. Are these stories historical fact or ancient fiction? Experts debunk the tale of King Arthur, one of the world’s most popular and enduring legends. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | History | Iconic People| Secondary

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The Handmaid’s Tale – Late (s01e03) (SBS Channel)

Offred visits Janine’s baby with Serena Joy and remembers the early days of the revolution before Gilead. Ofglen faces a difficult challenge. [Classified MA15+]

Drama |TV Series| Literature| Acting | Secondary

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Dr Karl’s Outrageous Acts of Science (s01e10) (Discovery Channel)

Dr Karl Kruszelnicki uncovers the principles behind some mind-boggling experiments, extraordinary inventions and jaw dropping scientific stunts. [Classified PG]

| News & Documentaries | Science & Technology | Physics | Chemistry | STEM | Secondary

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Wednesday


 

Starting Up, Starting Over (s01e04) (Lifestyle Channel)

Hani and Sarah are turning their backs on their comfortable suburban lives in South West London. The couple and their two young children move 100 miles up to the Malvern Hills. They are putting all their life savings into building their own Brewery to sell their own beer with no previous experience in the industry between them. [Classified PG]

Entertainment | Lifestyle & Documentaries | Jobs | Careers | Work Studies | Small Business | Business Studies | Marketing | Start Up | Secondary

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Land Speed Heroes (s01e01) (Discovery Turbo Channel)

Get set for an action-packed hour as professional and amateur speed freaks try to set land speed records on Utah’s famous Bonneville Salt Flats. From hot rod-racing soccer mums to jaw-dropping streamliners and everything in between, get your kicks with these adrenaline junkies. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | Science & Technology | Technology | Design | Mechanics | Cars | STEM | Secondary

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Thursday


 

Enemy Of The Reich (History Channel)

In 1943, Noor Khan was recruited as a covert operative into Churchill’s Special Operations. Khan became the only radio operator linking the British to the French Resistance, co-ordinating the airdrop of weapons and rescue of agents. [Classified M]

News & Documentaries | History | Secondary

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Rachel Hunter’s Tour Of Beauty – Hawaii (s02e05) (Lifestyle YOU Channel)

In Hawaii, Rachel learns that the Hawaiian secrets to health and beauty are intrinsically connected to nature. Oils, scrubs and flowers provide that Hawaiian glow. [Classified PG]

Entertainment | Lifestyle & Documentaries | Cultural Understanding | Mental Health | Health and PE | Self-Esteem | Self Care | Secondary

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Friday


 

Brain Games – Animal Vs Human (s04e16) (National Geographic Channel)

It’s going to be heads versus tails as we pit humans against animals in a series of unique competitions. If you play along, you’ll find out how a bird can eat like a horse and how a chimp can make you look like a chump. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | Science & Technology | Science | Human Brain | The Human Body | Psychology | Secondary | Upper Primary

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Graceful Girls (Arts Channel)

Primary school teacher Brianna Lee takes one last shot at fulfilling her lifelong dream, of winning Calisthenics’ most prestigious title, ‘Most Graceful Girl’. [Classified PG]

News & Documentaries | People & Culture | Arts | Performance Arts | Sports Training | Health and PE | Secondary | Upper Primary

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TV4Education – Training Series

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tv4ed 3 part training series(1)

***The series will be broadcast on youtube live. Why? Everyone has access to youtube – even if your school blocks youtube you will be able to watch from home or on your own device. Our training videos will be short and sweet so this way you can be ready to watch straight away – without waiting for any apps or downloads to be able to view the session.

What it will cover and who should watch – Learn everything there is to know about the NEW TV4Education. Now in Smartsuite, TV4Education has more features and add ons than ever before – AND it’s easier to use. If you’re a Teacher, Library Team Member, IT, Head of Learning or Principal, this series is for you.

Register here for our training series. We will verify the school you are from and then you will be sent the links to the newest available training video.

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