The History of Film

Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

jakob-owens-199505-unsplashHere at TV4Education, we have a lot of interest in film, and in particular, its development into a digital medium that all of us are so frequently exposed to today.

 

The development of film has had a significant impact upon the way we learn and our worldview, often forming the contextual backbone for much of our culture- either via immortalising historical moments or perpetuating them in the first place. Stop and consider for a moment just how many of our contemporary culture’s touchstones are either captured by, or initiated from, film (be it photography or the moving image).

 

Furthermore, we spend an immense amount of time in front of a screen- a 2017 study by Nielsen found that the average American household watches a collective 7 hours and 50 minutes of television per day (this doesn’t account for other screen-related activities, such as social media, utilising streaming services, YouTube, etc.). Australian statistics read fairly similarly- the quarterly review from Oztam found that the average Australian home now has 6.2 screens per household, the majority of which have internet capabilities, and as individuals, we spend approximately 26.4 days per annum watching television (again, this doesn’t account for screen-related activities outside of this).

 

The verdict is in, and like it or not, Western society as a whole is consuming vast quantities of visual and digital media everyday, with this only being on the rise. It stands to reason that with these rapid changes, the way that we learn and interact is changing too. Or perhaps it is merely being catered to better than ever before- according to Dr. Lynell Burmark, images are directly processed by our longterm memory, whereas words are filtered first by our short term memory, which only retains approximately 7 pieces of information. Additionally, 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and is processed 60,000 times faster than text.

 

Visual and digital media is more accessible than ever before- the click of a button and you can access information or virtually any subject from all over the globe. But in proportion to how much time we collectively spend consuming visual media, we tend to know comparatively little about its origins.

 

Film has changed a huge amount since its arguable genesis in the 1890s. Prior to this there were a number of precursors to film- be it the camera obscura, magic lanterns, stroboscopic animation devices or even shadow puppetry. Humanity as a whole has always had a fascination with the moving image.

 

The oldest surviving film in existence is the Roundhay Garden Scene by Louis Le Prince, made in 1888. At first appearance this film seems somewhat insignificant- it is a mere 2 seconds long, monochromatic and silent. Nonetheless, it captures something that photography and portraiture alone can’t capture- kinetic movement. Though this initial example lacks narrative, that was soon to come, and kineticism was to be a powerful part of story telling and our absorption of visual information, giving audiences the ability to see the subject moving from place to place and not only within the pages of a book or a theatre stage.   

Initial films from this time period were seen as vaudeville entertainment, generally lasting under a minute and far more absorbed with the technology of the moving image than the story or information that image was attempting to convey- predominantly a novelty at this point. However, from there, film developed at a breakneck pace. In the span of a decade, cinema became a way to bring stage performances to the masses, in addition to travelogues, the latter of which catered beautifully to the Victorian fascination with exoticism. It wasn’t long before film was considered to be a medium in its own right, rather than a temporary curio, developing its own metalanguage of cinematography, with one of the first films with more than one shot being Robert W. Paul’s 1898 ‘Come Along, Do!’. And no surprise either- film clearly touched upon the power of visuals, something that was far more universal than a vocal language, though that too would come to be incorporated into the scope of cinema.

 

It wasn’t long before film turned from being a novelty to being considered serious business, with the first film-exclusive theatre, ‘The Nickelodeon’, opening in 1905. By 1910, film actors were being credited for their roles, and the films that they were starring in became increasingly longer, featuring narrative flow and character arcs.

 

In America, film companies quickly tried to find a unified base, initially splitting the year between Fort Lee and Jacksonville, before congregating to Hollywood by World War 1. By now there was a huge global influx for this noveau industry, with the United States, Italy Germany, France and Britain leading the way, in addition to smaller, less centralised film hubs such as Denmark and Russia.

 

Whilst the film industry was on the rise, the commencement and duration of World War 1 brought about a significant transition for the industry, with many companies and countries’ industries either collapsing entirely or vastly reducing their scale of production. This shift toppled the French and Italian monopoly as the the center of film production, with America / Hollywood coming to the forefront in their wake. By the 1920s, Hollywood was producing over 800 films per annum, over 80% of the total global film production. Additionally, going to the cinema was quickly becoming a weekly necessity, with approximately 50 million Americans attending every week. With the vast amounts of people coming to seem films every week, Hollywood began to create their own culture, implementing the ‘star system’ and garnering a huge amount of control over the public presentation and lives of their actors.

 

The development of the industry once again picked up in the post-war environment, with the first film with sound being released in 1927. Within two years, Hollywood had almost entirely shunned the silent film, and whilst the change was markedly slower in the rest of the world, the impact of sound was evident and the apparent immersion into film was nigh on complete. The inclusion of sound gave birth to the musical film in addition to the modern horror film, with the release of King Kong, Dracula and Frankenstein in the early 1930s. In addition to this, the invention of technicolour in 1916 positively revolutionised the industry, evident in multiple films from the period, such as the Wizard of Oz or America’s first animated feature, ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.’

 

Much of this development happened in the lull between the post WW1 environment, with the industry shifting yet again in the 1940s- Britain once again gained a foothold on the industry via their influx of wartime propaganda films, with America following suit with films such as Casablanca (1942) and reflecting the disillusionment of the war via the cynicism of film noir, such as the Maltese Falcon (1941), Double Indemnity (1944) and The Big Sleep (1946).

 

Post World War 2 left no breathing room, with the Cold War commencing soon afterward. The threat of communism loomed large over the industry, with many members of the Hollywood film industry, including Charlie Chaplin and Dalton Trumbo, being blacklisted. Notably, this time period of the early 1950s was largely impacted by the commonplace introduction of the television into the home, with many film studios turning to satire or spectacle (as demonstrated by influx of 3D films and alien themed science fiction) the to keep audiences.

 

That is not to say that television toppled the film industry, far from it. However, the rise of screen time only catapulted from here, with the average American household watching nearly an hour and a half more television by 1959 than they did at the beginning of the decade. Couple that with the fact that Americans are now spending almost 24 hours per week online, with streaming service Netflix boasting over 137 million subscribers as of 2018, little over a decade after the company moved into online video streaming in 2007 and only being available worldwide since 2016. With this in mind, Netflix users had streamed over 42.5 billion hours of video via the service as of 2015, with their userbase currently spending over 100 million hours per day watching content. It seems that watching content has moved from being an event or outing to being an extension of our day to day lives, with accessibility and portability being the order of the day.

 

The way that we interact and learn has changed over the years, with our visual bias being catered to more and more as the years go by. Additionally, there is a growing expectation from consumers for a sense of immediacy with visual media, hence the requirement of portability- we want content that will fit into our lives, that we can access anywhere, anytime, on any device. As technology is viewed more and more as an extension of our day to day lives, it is a necessity that is just as flexible as we are.

 

Here at TV4Education, we endeavour to do just that- to provide you with great content that you can access 24/7, regardless of device or location. Because education should be easy, and TV4Education helps to achieve that.

 

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources in relation to this subject. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education, just search for the titles below on your site:

TV4Education:  The Hollywood War

TV4Education: Looking for Truffaut

Tv4Education: The Story of Film- An Odyssey- The 1930s- The Great American Movie Genres (S01E04)

Curated YouTube: The History of Cutting- The Birth of Cinema and Continuity Editing

Curated YouTube: The History and Science of Color Film: From Isaac Newton to the Coen Brothers

Curated YouTube: The Changing Shape of Cinema: The History of Aspect Ratio

YouTube: Movies are Magic: Crash Course Film History #1

YouTube: The History of Cinema- Silent Era

Lest We Forget

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

laura-goodsell-335009-unsplashANZAC Day is one of the most momentous days on both the Australian and New Zealand calendars, marking the anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli on April 25th, 1915. This was one of the first major military actions on behalf of the Australian and New Zealand forces in WW1, with the campaign resulting in the loss of more than 8,000 Australian lives, with over 60,000 Australian lives being lost over the course of WW1. ANZAC Day has thus come to commemorate the sacrifice of all those who served and protected their country, not only in WW1, but in every war, conflict and peacekeeping operation that has followed since.

Australia had been a federated nation for only 13 years prior to the landing at Gallipoli, and the ANZAC legend has undoubtedly formed a foundational part of our national identity. The 25th of April serves as an occasion on which to honour the camaraderie, bravery and sacrifice of our troops in protecting the freedom of our country and Australian way of life. It is an opportunity to reflect upon the contribution of friends and family members, both past and present, and to pay our respects to those who built the values by which we uphold ourselves to on a national scale.

‘Lest we forget’ is one of the seminal phrases of the ANZAC tradition, and for good reason- it is an occasion of commemoration and serves as a constant reminder to never forget the imprint of every person who has contributed to the protection of our nation, commencing with many of our ancestors in Gallipoli. Understanding the history of this contribution is unquestionably a key part of continuing the ANZAC tradition and giving it the full scope and honour that it deserves.

As ANZAC Day approaches, it is a wonderful opportunity to reflect upon its history and significance, and how it continues to influence our lives to this day. Here at TV4Education, we wholeheartedly believe in the enduring influence of education, and understanding the sacrifice, history and stories of the ANZACs and the role they played in the formation of our cultural identity is undoubtedly a part of that, so that this tradition will be perpetuated for generations to come. Lest we forget.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources in relation to ANZAC Day. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education, just search for the titles below on your site:

Lest We Forget What

Gallipoli Symphony

Gallipoli (1981 movie)

Monash- The Forgotten ANZAC

ANZACs- Remembering Our Heroes

ANZAC Girls- Adventure (S01E01)

Deadline Gallipoli Part 1 (S01E01)

ANZAC Day National Dawn Service Canberra

 

 

Soup Cans and Superstars: How Pop Art Changed the World

SmartLessons, Sophie's Tips, Tips and Tricks, Video Highlights

cris-tagupa-606858-unsplashPop art is one of the seminal art movements of the mid 20th century: brash, bold and instantly iconic. Whilst it was arguably initiated in Britain, it took root in the advertisements and commercialism of the modern American landscape, designed to appear lightweight and vacuous. However, as host Alastair Sookes states in the documentary Soup Cans and Superstars: How Pop Art Changed the World, pop art has far more depth than it is often given credit for, being utilised to ‘expose the dark side of the American dream.’

What exactly is pop art? In 1957, pop artist Richard Hamilton defined it as the following: ‘popular (designed for a mass audience); transient (short term solution); expendable (easily forgotten); low cost; mass produced; young (aimed at youth); witty; sexy; gimmicky; glamorous; and big business.’ In short, it seeks to emulate the industry of its eponymous popular (pop) culture, mass media and advertising that it so often commentates on, bringing commercial art into the gallery.

Unlike many art movements, à la Dadaism, Futurism, Symbolism, Realism, Surrealism, Cubism and more, pop art wasn’t initiated with a strict manifesto regarding its boundaries or its foundation. However, like many of these movements, pop art plays with the boundaries of what is considered to be art, creating syncretism between ‘high’ and ‘low’ culture. The majority of the pop art movement was formed in isolation, made cohesive by the spirit of the time rather than commonality with other artists. Indeed, as curator Henry Geldzahler stated to Andy Warhol, ‘It was like a science fiction movie- you pop artists in different parts of the city, unknown to each other, rising up out of the muck and staggering forward with your paintings in front of you.’

Many famous pop artists, such as Warhol and James Rosenquist had their start in advertising. Their artwork often plays with the concepts of consumerism, celebrity and media, of mass reproduction, and the advertising ideal of happiness being a commodity. Advertising as we know it today had its genesis in the late 1940’s and 50’s, with the introduction of television advertisements, and pop art, coming to the forefront in the 1950’s and 60’s, was very much a reactionary framework for artists. As Sookes notes, pop art ‘holds up a mirror to the times… in all its Technicolor, tarnished glory.’ Against the backdrop of the Cold War and in a post WWII society, the glossy façade of celebrity and mass media was increasingly apparent, with the dichotomy between their projected optimism and artist’s cynicism being a frequent theme, prominently displayed in works such as Warhol’s ‘Marilyn Diptych’, Rosenquist’s ‘F-111’ and Roy Lichtenstein’s ‘Whaam!’

Pop art is a unique movement, in that in often directly participates in perpetuating the very aspects it is commenting on. A perfect example of this is Warhol’s infamous ‘Factory’, which cemented him as one of the first ‘business artists’, a model that has found favour with many contemporary artists (Jeff Koons and Damien Hirst spring to mind). Warhol’s method of screen printing allowed him to mass produce his work, this mechanical, accessible art style being a direct representation of Western consumerism, with Warhol noting that what was wonderful about America was that they ‘started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola… you know that the President drinks Coca-Cola, Liz Taylor drinks Coca-Cola… you can drink Coca-Cola, too. A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke.’ This is further extrapolated in his famous ‘Campbell’s Soup Cans’, playing with everyday, highly recognisable imagery, and in doing so, taking art out of the gallery and into everyday life.

Whilst pop art is often intrinsically linked with the golden age of advertising in America, Sookes is also quick to note that it didn’t only find its home in the U.S.A. Pop art stretched to Britain, France, Germany and the USSR, often finding its beginnings as protest art. However, it consolidated its place in China’s late 20th century economic boom, as they embraced political reform and opened their doors to Western society. Long after the NY Times had declared the pop movement as ‘dead’, pop art found new life in China’s ‘tiger economy’ of the 1980’s, something that has continued into their current day art scene, reflecting an inherent fascination with the deeply embedded role that the nation has in the culture of consumerism and mass production.

Pop art is one of the major art movements of the mid 20th century, however, its reach stretches far beyond the typical association with the so called ‘golden age of advertising’ from the 1950’s and 60’s. Pop art has undoubtedly informed our perception of art today, serving as a direct commentary on our culture and influencing the business model of many current artists, utilising mass production and an assimilation of popular culture as a means of furthering their reach. The documentary Soup Cans and Superstars is an excellent resource in the study of this fascinating movement and will undoubtedly assist students in their understanding.

Here’s a list of TV4Education resources that can be used in relation to the topics covered in this post. If you use the SmartSuite version of TV4Education, just search for the titles below on your site:

Soup Cans and Superstars- How Pop Art Changed the World

Alan Cumming on Pop Art

Pop Artist Roy Lichtenstein

A Guide to Pop Art

Behind the Artist- Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol

TED-ED Lessons Worth Sharing- A Brief History of Graffiti

Shark Tank – Investing and Entrepreneurship

Newsletters, SmartLessons, Video Highlights

Humanities and Social Sciences – Economics and Business

Curriculum Code: (ACHEK020)

Aim:
Students understand how people derive an Alternative sources income.

Preparing:

Ask students to give you 10 different businesses that they use everyday. (E.G. apple, coles etc)

Presenting:
Investing

Shark Tank http://www.tv4education.com.au/SmartLibrary/SmartLibraryWeb/TitleView.html?BookID=153106.01

Owning a business
Be your Own Boss
http://www.tv4education.com.au/SmartLibrary/SmartLibraryWeb/TitleView.html?BookID=139810.01

Choose a business case from each of the programs and ask students if they would invest/Start that business.

Divide class into business owners and investors. Give half different businesses with Financials, growth and details.
Give the other Half a portfolio of money and different businesses they own.
Use Shark Tank.doc to look at businesses and investors portfolios, you can use this list create your own or get your students to make up businesses.

Applying:
Get students with businesses to find investment and investors to find a business that will be good for their portfolio.
Get students to discuss why they should be invested in or why they should accept the terms from the investor.
After get them to explain why they choose their partners.
Read out list of successful companies and the companies who failed. (Mix up the ones that didn’t get investment with those that did that were successful)

Links:
Stock Market Game
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/games/off-site/ogol/_invest-quest.html

All About Arts

Newsletters, Video Highlights
ballet

Budding Stars Of The Paris Opera Ballet – The New School Episode 1 of 6 shows us what it takes to be a star at the Paris Opera Ballet. The challenges the students face and how they get to the top of their discipline.

modernart

THE ADVENTURES OF MODERN ART – PICASSO AND HIS GANG What was Picasso like in his youth? The Adventures of Modern Art gives us an insight into how he became one of the worlds most famous and influential artists.

ac68a16a-a95f-4c5b-ac34-77dfce3ba1b2

Ai Weiwei – Never Sorry Alison Klayman documents the life and work of Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei. She showcases his artistic process as he prepares for a museum exhibition, his relationships with family members and his clashes with the government.

Want to view the whole newsletter? CLICK HERE

The Record Breakers

Newsletters, Video Highlights

What does it mean to win Gold?

With the opening ceremony of the 2016 Olympics we wait in anticipation as we see if the limits of human ability is once again shattered.

The 4 minute mile was said to be impossible for humans, but since Roger Bannister showed that is was possible thousands even people still in high school have been able to achieve this.

We celebrate those who broke the records, some born with super human abilities and others who had super human dedication and drive. Share these stories with your students and tell them what some call impossible others are training to show it is.

MSDCORU EC007

Cool Runnings (1993) The true story about four Jamaicans planning to compete as bobsled racers at the Winter Olympics

cof

Chariots Of Fire – (1982) Two British track athletes, one a determined Jew and the other a devout Christian, compete in the 1924 Olympics.

Team USA celebrates "the Miracle on Ice"

MIRACLE (2014) Miracle tells the true story of Herb Brooks (Russell), the player-turned-coach who led the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team to victory over the seemingly invincible Russian squad.

 

OLY 1984  EDWIN MOSES

Sporting Greats – Edwin Moses Edwin Moses won 107 consecutive finals, set the world record in the 400m hurdles event four times and won a gold medal at the 1976 and 1984 Olympics.

NC

Sporting Greats – Nadia Comaneci Nadia Comaneci winner of five Olympic gold medals at the 1976 and the 1980 Olympics and is the first female gymnast to be awarded a perfect score of 10 in an Olympic gymnastic event.

Want to view the full newsletter? Click HERE

Naidoc Week

Newsletters, Video Highlights

NAIDOC celebrations are held around Australia each July to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The week is celebrated not just in the Indigenous communities but also in increasing numbers of government agencies, schools, local councils and workplaces.

first aus.jpeg

First Australians – They Have Come To Stay

This landmark series chronicles the birth of contemporary Australia as never told before, from the perspective of its first people. It explores what unfolds when the oldest living culture in the world is overrun by the world’s greatest empire, and depicts the true stories of individuals – both black and white. The story begins in 1788 in Sydney with the friendship between an Englishmen, Governor Phillip, and a warrior, Bennelong.

Part 1 of 7

art.jpeg

art + soul – Home and Away

Art + Soul explores the diversity of Indigenous culture through three themes – home and away, dreams and nightmares and bitter and sweet. Drawing on key works from the Gallery’s collection, it reveals the myriad of contemporary artistic expressions that evidence the enduring heritage of Indigenous Australia, in all its diversity and complexity.

Part 1 of 3

Animated traditional stories explained by the Elders including the Dolphin NSW and the Wanka Manapulpa Minyma, WA
Animated traditional stories explained by the Elders including the Dolphin NSW and the Wanka Manapulpa Minyma, WA

 

mengannine.jpeg

Manganinnie

Through Lyrical images, Manganinnie journeys across mountains towards the coast with Joanna, a white girl, in search of Manganinnie’s vanished tribe. The poignancy of this film derives from the Aboriginal woman’s gradual realization that her people and the tribal way of life are forever gone. It is the story of the Black Drive of 1830, the attempted genocide of the Tasmanian Aborigines.

anzacs.jpeg

Anzacs Remembering Our Heroes

Anzacs – Remembering our heroes is a series of 15 minute documentary specials, produced by NITV to pay tribute to the military efforts of Indigenous people.

colour.jpeg

Colour Theory – Teho Ropeyarn

From the northernmost tip of far north Queensland, Teho Ropeyarn’s bold prints have traversed Australia, winning awards and representing the distinctive culture of the Torres Strait Islands.

lurujarri.jpeg

Lurujarri Dreaming

This beautifully crafted animated documentary retraces the Lurujarri Dreaming Trail from the Goolarabooloo community in the Western Kimberley region of Western Australia.

cleverman

Cleverman (s01e01)

A series of unexplained violent attacks in the city are blamed on the newly discovered ‘Hairypeople’, who have been living and passing among us, without our knowledge.

Part 1 of 6

songlines

Songlines – Footprints

Footprints is a film of the story, dance and culture of the Djugun people that has been brought to life from the dirt after 50 years, handed back to the Djugun people from its caretaker Roy Wiggan

Part 1 of 12

jandamarra.jpeg

Jandamarra’s War

The story of an Australian Aboriginal man who should be as famous as Ned Kelly. In 1894, Jandamarra led a three year rebellion against invading pastoralists in defence of his people’s ancient land and culture.

chant.jpeg

The Chant Of Jimmie Blacksmith (1978)

Jimmie Blacksmith (Tommy Lewis), a man of half-Aboriginal ancestry, is pushed to the breaking point by the racist oppression perpetrated by the British in their rule of Australia in 1900, and by his inability to acclimate to Western culture. Raised in a white Christian family but never recognized by white individuals as their equal, Blacksmith undergoes frequent humiliations that provoke a violent response when he brutally murders his employer’s family.

walkabout.png

Walkabout (1971)

Under the pretense of having a picnic, a geologist (John Meillon) takes his teenage daughter (Jenny Agutter) and 6-year-old son (Lucien John) into the Australian outback and attempts to shoot them. When he fails, he turns the gun on himself, and the two city-bred children must contend with harsh wilderness alone. They are saved by a chance encounter with an Aborigine boy (David Gulpilil) who shows them how to survive, and in the process underscores the disharmony between nature and modern life.

Geography Week – a global ticket from your classroom

Newsletters, Video Highlights

headerexplanation

hawaii

Wild Hawaii – Land of fire

Explore the fiery heart of Hawaii — from volcanic eruptions spewing rivers of molten lava to spiders that smile, fish that climb and turtles that bury secrets in a landscape that defies expectations. Learn about the monster at Hawaii’s molten core, Kilauea, one of the most active volcanoes on Earth. See how Hawaii’s creatures have evolved to be different from their cousins the world over. Finally, we show how 95 percent of the flora on these islands does not exist anywhere else in the world.

travel man

Travel Man – Iceland

Richard and Jessica Hynes explore the wild and wanton scenery of Iceland. Find out more about the places they visited.

istanbul

Travel Man – Istanbul

Richard and comedian Adam Hills get a massage, a very close shave, and do some haggling.

marrakech

Travel Man – Marrakech

Richard and Stephen Mangan eat steamed sheep’s head and go camel riding in the desert.

gala

Nature’s Microworlds – Galapagos

A visit to arguably the most famous archipelago on Earth, the Galapagos. It’s home to a myriad of bizarre and unique creatures, endemic to these islands – but how did they get here and what is the key to these extraordinary islands that allows them to thrive? 

east capeThe East Cape

The East Coast of New Zealand is a spectacular coast blessed in stunning beauty. Lonely shores are strewn with driftwood, while picture postcard sandy bays lure just a handful of visitors.

wild britainWild Britain – January To March

This enchanting series that reveals why Britain’s climate is so unique and why the country’s relationship with its wildlife is so enduring and so special.

wild arabiaWILD ARABIA – Sand, Wind and Stars

Revealing the astonishing landscapes, extraordinary wildlife and remarkable people found in the vast region of Arabia, which stands at the crossroads of three continents.

cool japanCOOL JAPAN – WINTER

Convenience stores are lined with winter edition products, and the changing of kotatsu, futons, and even tableware in households for the winter is a wintry scene unique to Japan. A foreign guest visits the location of anglerfish, the king of winter food loved by the Japanese. 

urban lifeExploration India – Urban Life

What is life like in urban India? Join a team of 13 year olds as they travel from the UK to learn about life as a teenager in their native land.

Why is politics important?

Newsletters, Video Highlights

Why is politics important?

This newsletter will tell us about the origins of politics, the various types of government that exists and how this will affect the current and future generations.

Dictatorship

A dictatorship is a government or a social situation where one person makes all the rules and decisions without input from anyone else. Watch a dictator in action.

Communism

At the opposite end of the spectrum from capitalism, communism is an economic theory favouring a classless society and the abolition of private property. Watch a communist in action here.

Aristocracy

A person who’s “born to rule” belongs to the ruling class, or aristocracy, and is “noble” just by being in the family line. Whether they have done anything noble or not. Watch an aristocrat in action here.

Stalinism

The method of rule, or policies, of Joseph Stalin, Soviet Communist Party and state leader from 1929 until his death in 1953. Stalinism is associated with a regime of terror and totalitarian rule. Watch him in action here.

a1

Capitalism

Capitalism is an economic system featuring the private ownership of business wealth and the free and unfettered operation of trade markets. Watch a video that will highlight how capitalism works.

a2

Democracy

With Democracy the people get to decide the laws and ethics of a country. This allowed rights disallowed by many to be changed. Civil rights has effected every level of our society changing the laws we once held in high regard to shape the more common way people live their lives in 2016.

Race, gender and sexuality becoming issues which divided many nations, but with democracy we were able to collectively decide if this is what we want as a society. Watch a video that will highlight how democracy works.

Civil Rights

a1

Vote Yes For Aborigines

The 1967 referendum on Aborigines first saw that, Aboriginal people were finally counted as people, before they came under the Flora and Fauna Act. This lead on to the right to vote and access to many other liberties others had access to for decades.

a2

How Women Won The Vote

In 1902 Women were finally allowed to vote. Only 150 Years ago women had no rights when it came to voting or owning land. This documentary shows the lengths that these Australian men and women went to, ensuring this change.

a1

SELMA

After the Abolition of slavery in America in 1865 a hundred years later free people of colour were still unable to vote, access the same places, use the same facilities and go to the same schools as other Americans. Selma is the story of a famous March and turning point in the civil rights movement of the 1960’s. The use of “Jim Crow” laws allowed for the continued mistreatment of fellow American citizens by those sworn to serve and protect them.

a2.jpeg

SUFFRAGETTES FOREVER – WOMEN AND POWER PART 1 

In the early 19th Century only those who owned property were allowed to vote in parliamentary elections. This included women who were rate payers. Thanks to the sufferage movements of the early 20th century those who did not own property both men and women finally were allowed to vote, Part 1 of the series shows some of the tactics used to get the vote for all. This legacy lead to modern Democracy as we know it.

Revolutions

Revolutions are the end result when societies are unable to come together collectively to change the rules in which makes that society unfair to a majority of people.

Spartacus

Spartacus was a thracian gladiator who, along with other escaped slaves began the Third Servile War, a major slave uprising against the Roman Republic. The rebellion has proved inspiration for many who have faced similar circumstances.

1916 – The Irish Rebellion

The Easter Rising or Easter Rebellion was an armed insurrection in Ireland during Easter week April 1916. The rising was launched by Irish republicans who wanted to end British rule in Ireland and establish a independent Irish Republic. Part 1 of 3

Braveheart

Sir William Wallace was a Scottish knight who became one of the main leaders of the Wars of Scottish Independence. The Battle of Stirling Bridge where the English were defeated and caused William Wallace to be given the title Guardian of Scotland. The Battle of Falkirk saw the Scottish defeated and Sir William Wallace stood down from his title. He was captured in 1305 and Hung for High Treason.

Jandamarra’s War

Jandamarra lead a 3 year organised war against european colonists. He became a legend with his people the Bunuba Tribe, who believed he was immortal as he used hit and run tactics killing many police and settlers. He was finally killed by Micki, another Aboriginal tracker who was recruited by his children being held hostage by local police.

The Future

9c41e6a6-ec24-4aaf-acd8-0cdd2c56f687.jpeg

 PEOPLE & POWER – WHATS HAPPENING TO AMERICAN DEMOCRACY PART 1

What’s happening to American democracy? With a populist billionaire demagogue winning support on the right, a self-declared socialist confounding US historical prejudices on the left and millions of disenchanted voters apparently determined to disregard the political establishment in Washington, the nomination race for this year’s presidential poll has become one of the most peculiar and polarised electoral contests in decades.

Donald Trump – The Apprentice President

Since announcing his candidacy, Donald Trump is everywhere. This billionaire candidate has become the champion of ordinary America, who travel for hundreds of miles to see him.

Generation X- The Politics of X

A look at how the political consciousness of Generation X evolved over several decades especially in terms of race and women’s rights.

The Budget

See how the government decides how taxes, spending and cuts are decided and how they affect us all. With 50% of tax breaks going to the top 10% of earners. Many see the budget as unfair whilst others see it as just a part of a capitalistic society.

Popular Videos – what are other schools watching?

Video Highlights

Ever wondered what programs other schools in Australia are watching? Take a look at Mays most downloaded programs across Australia by clicking on the image below.

got

Classroom Videos – just for you

Tips and Tricks

Welcome to Teachers Pet

Untitled

Need a video for a lesson you are preparing?

It can be as broad as “Help me find an algebra video”. Or as specific as “I have a year nine male only class learning about gravity – help”.

Whatever the question ask the “teachers pet” and you will find a list of suggested videos waiting for you in your inbox. Add the videos to a program yourself or forward the email to your students and promote the topic you are covering.

Finding Teachers Pet

1st make sure that you are logged in to the TV4Education website. Teachers Pet needs you to be logged in so she can send videos directly to you. You will then see the Teachers Pet friendly face above the red YouTube results. Click on her to ask a question!